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Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

Good move on contacting counsel. My mother had a neighbor try that on an unmarked property line once..that ran under a garage that had been built across it one time. It had never been surveyed in our recollection...and since the property owner was an officer of the court..they thought they could get away with it. If she knew my mother she never would have tried it...because mom just told the attorney to make them fight long enough that the expense of the litigation..would way exceed the cost of the property if they had been honest..and made us an offer on the additional property they wished to claim. They eventually saw the light..paid for some extra property...and I doubt they'll ever try something like that again.
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Honored Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

We have a dumbass (sorry, no better word for him) neighbor on an acre parcel that a previous owner of this place cut out for someone to build on, about forty years ago.  The house has been through several owners, and one of them had asked the tenant farmer on the farm, who was renting it when we bought it, to plow as close to the house as possible, so he would have less grass to cut. 

 

So, the prpopety line had gotten "vague," and I had never had reason to define it.  This jerk came over one day with his hat on backwards, and starting berating Mike in our own yard, for the farmer plowing up his land.  So, the men went over and foudn the corner markers, adn set his boundaries.  They were WAY tighter than originally thought. 

 

This was after his landscaper had piled several pickup laods of tree trimmings in our surrrounding field (which I had to tell him to remove..."It's not a damned landfill...you paid him to put it there, pay him to take it off!"). Somehwere after tje line location, he piled a couple tons of storm debris across the line, too.  SIL and Mike pushed it back with the frontend loader. 

 

A year or so later, a shed company dropped his new shed ten feet over the line, which was 35 feet past his legal setback.  I drove over, walked back, and he intercepted me, on my land.  All I said was, "Thanks for the new shed."  It was moved the next day. 

 

This guy has packed his yard with car sheds...he collects old cars.  I know he would like to buy land to expand, but I am not selling.  He has just been too ugly about it all.

 

There are several more incidents he has created, but the funniest one was the expensive brick mailbox post with a concrete alligator playing golf on top.  That went on our land, across the road.  We didn't have to say a word...the state DOT took care of that one. 

 

My point is, some people just don't get that they have limits when it comes to someone else's land.  We have to deal with hunt clubs, timber companies, mining companies, and DOT in two states, as well as idiots like the one adjoining us. IF you lay down for any of them, they will walk all over you and your place. 

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Honored Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

Please, do NOT use a hog facility as a threat.  Those of us who make our living in hogs do not need your bad blood.  There are other ways to skin this cat....

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

Kay I have worked with hogs for years! I currently work on a neighbors 1,500 head farrow to wean operation that weans over 30,000 pigs a year... I am no stranger to hogs.

 

A few years back I remember hearing of a farmer to my south who had a dispute with a rich non farmer neighbor of his over dust from his field or something to that effect. The farmer told his neighbor to leave him alone or he would build a large hog operation in that field instead of raising corn or beans. I heard that ended the dispute.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

You are right though..... Probably not a good idea to use a hog facility as a threat.

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Honored Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

We turn somewhere between 80-85,000 weaners to feeders every year.  I would rather live next to a hog/sheep/horse farm like mine, than the row crop farm that adjoins our yard. 

 

I bite my tongue, and bear aerial sprayed pesticides, and Heaven only knows what kinds of nematicides incorporated at planting, going into our shallow groundwater.  Every drop of water we drink has to be filtered...I've seen pesticides that were applied nearly 20 years ago still stunting and discoloring spots in our hay crop.   

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Senior Advisor

Mending Wall

This poem by Robert Frost has so many shades of meaning, so many subtle innuendoes in it's words.  There is something in this poem for those who love walls and those who hate them.  It's a very good poem, to my mind.

 

Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
And spills the upper boulders in the sun,
And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them and made repair
Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
No one has seen them made or heard them made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there.
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go.
To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors'.
Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it
Where there are cows?
But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That wants it down.' I could say 'Elves' to him,
But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather
He said it for himself. I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me~
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father's saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, "Good fences make good neighbors." 

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Honored Advisor

Entropy

Seems that is the term we learned in physics class, to describe the tendency of Nature to assert its own order, which often appears to us as disorder. 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

Wow 80,000+ hogs a year.... That's a lot of pigs! We have several hog operations in my county in varying size. Hog and cattle operations in the Midwest are somewhat limited in size due to winter. With crops in the fields 6 months out of the year and frozen ground for an additional 4.... That don't leave a lot of time for manure applications. In the event of a wet spring or prolonged winter livestock operations really thread the needle for time in some years. If you have ever seen a lagoon overflow or break that might change your mind as to what you may want in your back yard. The worst lagoon break I have ever seen happened when I was stationed at Ft Drum in upstate NY. A large dairy farms lagoon broke and spilled into the Black River killing millions of fish and making towns downstream wreak of manure. I suppose it matters more as to who farms the field next door rather than what.

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Honored Advisor

Re: Property Boundries

Quite true about how ( which usually means who) v what is across the property line, on a host of concerns. 

 

We have hay crops in the field 12 month sof the year, using a creative mixture of interseedings and overseedings.  This, with our milder climate, allows us a 12-month land application window for manure applications.   January-March can get really soggy here, especially if we get a string of nor'easters...1998 was a prime example.  That one kicked me into the research gear, so we had a more receptive planting mix. 

 

We do a proactive application of sludge out of one of our three lagoons every year, to keep those levels down below statutory limits.  This is essentially our own private fertilizer mine system now. 

 

The nursery manure effluent is minimally rich with N as a rule, compated to the water from older animals.  I characaterize it as more of a "manure tea" (which organic or old-timey gardeners will recognize)  than a true slurry.  This liquid really has very little aroma - earthy more than anything else - when we irrigate with it through the traveling gun. 

 

We have buried a couple miles, I guess, of PVC for a riser system, to minimize chances of spills.  The fields are all flat as pancakse, excpet for field borders that have flitering grasses, and the cover is total and permanent vegetative stands of mixed grasses and legumes.  It's a good setup,. as manure management systems go. 

 

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