cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Jim Meade / Iowa City
Senior Advisor

Soldering Iron

I'm looking for a soldering iron for use in connecting plugs and sockets to coax.  I think something about 80-100 watts might do.  What I need is something that will hold a lot of heat and apply it quickly.  A smaller iron won't do the job and a gun tends to be too hot and takes too long to heat up.  

 

So - anyone have any suggestions on a 80-100 W electric soldering iron? 

0 Kudos
6 Replies
nwobcw
Advisor

Re: Soldering Iron

   Try Radio shack or Sears tool catalog.

0 Kudos
Jim Meade / Iowa City
Senior Advisor

Re: Soldering Iron

I know where to find them (as you know, Radio Shack doesn't have anything this heavy).  I was more looking for reviews or experiences by others on which size and brand they like in the 80-100 iron category.

0 Kudos
SEmiretired
Senior Reader

Re: Soldering Iron

Jim, if you not in a big hurry, search ebay, weller soldering guns. Have soldered many pl-259s to RG-213s in 58 years of the ham radio hobby. Went thru several Weller D550s, 325 and 250 watt guns. Have bought three good ones in the last three years for about an average of $25,00. Have one for every where including the airplane hanger. The 200- 100 watts can be bought a little cheaper. Have all sizes from the tip irons for rc aiplanes to the American Beatuy irons for 16 guage copper sheet. Also tips for the Wellers are not problem, radio shack carries a few and plenty on ebay.

 

Bob Chillocothe, Ohio

0 Kudos
Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Soldering Iron

Neverreally noticed the wattage of my irons, but I use Weller soldering irons for hours on end, working in stained glass. On,y brand my instructor sold, and the shop I frequented when she retired, too. Excellent tools.

Whenevr I am looking for any item now, I generally search for it under " all departments" on amazon.com. They sell almost everything, and act as a great clearinghouse for smaller vendors via amazon marketplace. Prices are better than many alternatives, and shipping is very often free.

I have found that i can read many reviews on amazon, too. Most people write pretty good in-depth information, pro and con.

Whether it is a kitchen gadget or something sizable, I cannot think of a consumer item I have need or wanted for years that I was
unable to find online on the amazon website. Got specialized state equine law signs in two days this past week, just by typing in the search phrase on amazon.
0 Kudos
Nebrfarmr
Veteran Advisor

Re: Soldering Iron

I own two soldering guns, a Weller, and a Sears Craftsman.  They actually look an awful lot alike, and I almost wonder if the Craftsman couldn't use Weller tips, or vice-versa.


My thoughts:  The Weller Industrial is just that, industrial.  For heavy use, and heavy wire, and I think it keeps your hand a little cooler if used for a length of time.  This is the one:  http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00917927000P?prdNo=4&blockNo=4&blockType=G4

 

However, the Craftsman is perfectly adequate for most of my uses, which go up to 8 GA stranded wire, and with a bit of patience, I can solder ends on 6GA stranded.  The Weller can do 6GA all day without a whimper.  The Craftsman is lighter, and heats up a bit quicker, and the little lights on the front are more than a gimmick, they actually do help light up what you are working on.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00954046000P?prdNo=2

 

One thing I like about both of them is they have dual power settings available based on how hard you pull back on the trigger.  You pull it to 'high' to get the tip hot (maybe 10 seconds on the Crafstman, 14 or 15 on the Weller) and then go to 'low' power to maintain the heat.  Remember, too hot a tip is almost as bad as too cold of one.

 

I wind up using the Craftsman 90% of the time because it is lighter, heats up quicker, and is cheaper to replace if I drop it & it breaks.  I only use the Weller for big jobs.

0 Kudos
Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Soldering Iron

I'm doing a different application all together, but soldering sometimes for several hoiurs straight. My instructor recommended Weller, and sold them along with oer brands...but she didn't really recommend the others. I never feel heat in my working hand using them, even going through several pounds of solder on a glass project.

0 Kudos