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Frequent Contributor

Water worries

We've been getting snow in west central Iowa in 2014, but still could have a moisture deficit this growing season.

The long-term outlook is a greater concern. The Water Resources Group estimates that water demand will rise 50% by 2030.
In arid regions of the U.S., water consumption exceeds 100% of available rainfall. Despite torrential rains, California is

likely to come up short this season. What new approaches to water use would you like to see happen?

 

--Cheryl Tevis, SF

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6 Replies
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Water worries

No more growing corn in areas that require irrigation. The experts say we have too much corn anyway, we need an acreage reduction in corn.

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Advisor

Re: Water worries

I would like to see urban governments consider limiting water useage on residential homes with pools and lawns before they come to demand more water from agriculture.  Cropland in California will sit idle this year, sacrificed so urban residents can continue as they are.  They even should look at ways to increase efficiancies in converting ocean water to drinking water.  They can afford this cost better than ag can.

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Advisor

Re: Water worries

Urban- no water usage to beautify lawns etc.

Recycling water from sewage treatment plants. Probably cheaper than treating sea water.
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Senior Advisor

Re: Water worries

Los Angeles California already has this proocess in place of recycling wastewater--- 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Water worries

Do you mean the Water Resources Group, a commercial organization?  Doesn't look right.

http://www.waterresourcesgroup.com/IRM/content/default.aspx

Or 2030 Water Resources Group, an interest or activist organization?

http://www.2030wrg.org/

Water is essential, but I have to admit I've lived through the oil scarcity concern so I meet the subject with somewhat more skepticisim than younger peoplel might.  Been there, done that, one might say.

It seems at least some of the issue is that people want to live where there is insufficient water in the first place, so we end up moving water, which one would think would be inefficient and costly.  Why don't people move to where the water is available?  That incentive can be accomplished by market forces.  Charge people for what it costs to deliver water and let them figure part of it out for themselves.

 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Water worries

Market forces being the key word which  "extend " to political forces - I have observed the Governor of Nevada and the Las Vegas  Mayor Goodman with her firm stance being Vegas has priority over the rest of the state period - who would you side with and or bet the farm  the tree huggers or the mayor ---

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