cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Veteran Contributor

Barn restoration project

Jump to solution

We have a barn that has stood since my family bought this ground in the early 1980's. We are not sure of the exact age but it was for sure built in the early 1900's. Possibly before 1910. It is not a huge barn by any means. 40' x 40' two story barn. Just a plain jane barn. No lean to. We use it to this day for bringing in calves and storeing grain and other things inside. But the years are showing its wear. The front of it has a good lean to one side and the foundation along one whole side and corner is falling away and parts of the barn arent even on the foundation.

 

We would like to restore it but the cost is so great. I have spent several years trying to find grants or even loans that may work for doing a restoration. Since we dont know much about its past i dont know anything about its historic value which seems to be weighed heavily for most grants. 

 

Does anybody have an ideas, advice or even experience in such a thing?

1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Barn restoration project

Jump to solution

dear barn owner, Yes I have experience straightning crooked barns. I also have a way for you to  make these repairs and save alot of money. Years ago a possible client called about  a polebarn. After we met he told me how he wanted to save money by providing labor, himself and his friend. The arrangement worked very well.  In doing building repair, you must of-course have a lead man who knows what to do, as well as LEAD.. If this is a possibility for you, let me know and I can give you more pointers on how to make it happen.  P.S. the client became a very good friend.

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
5 Replies
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Barn restoration project

Jump to solution
 
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Barn restoration project

Jump to solution

dear barn owner, Yes I have experience straightning crooked barns. I also have a way for you to  make these repairs and save alot of money. Years ago a possible client called about  a polebarn. After we met he told me how he wanted to save money by providing labor, himself and his friend. The arrangement worked very well.  In doing building repair, you must of-course have a lead man who knows what to do, as well as LEAD.. If this is a possibility for you, let me know and I can give you more pointers on how to make it happen.  P.S. the client became a very good friend.

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Veteran Contributor

Re: Barn restoration project

Jump to solution

I would most deffinity be interested!

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Barn restoration project

Jump to solution

sorry about delay. First things first.  If the carpenter you hire does not have his own workers-comp-insurance, [ note, the certificate comes from adjent, not the carpenter ] you should call your liability guy,  and get a quote, from him. The insurance protects u more than the workers.   Now, the plan is the most important.  You will get a real sense of being able to work with someone as u spend some time with them. Building repair is an aspect of construction that has it's own special Saftey concerns. Acting as the contractor, it is up to you for materials, equipment, and even things like drinking-water. Afew suggestions: wasp+hornet spray, gloves, tarps, wheel-barrow, places to put depre, places to put what is saved.  These details are all part of the plan.  Remember, during working hours, the lead man is in charge. The work cannot progress smoothly otherwise.  Oh, almost forgot; if u have a regular job, use your vacation time to get the job going.  After work, but before lead-man goes home is the time to work on details. Part of his job is to tell u what is needed ahead of time. Break the project into phases, so the  job is not overwhelming.  Lastly you should have an exit plan, if you find your lead man is not a good fit, you are prepared to dismiss him. If he creates the plan and material lists, [ presuming they are of value ] he should be paid something for that service upon dismissal, as well as wages earned.  The comp coverage is important.      any other questions u have, just fire-away.  Sawman1851

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Veteran Contributor

Re: Barn restoration project

Jump to solution

Comp. question is very important. Hired a guy to paint a roof. Roof only 8 ft. off of ground. He fell off, will stepping onto roof, and broke his leg. My insurance says that my liability will not cover me. Case is going to court, as hired guy is suing me. Insurance companies like to take your money, but don't like to pay out.

0 Kudos