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nwobcw
Advisor

Blow water from hose

Is there a commercially made fitting to blow water from a hose.  Getting tired of hand draining the hose I use to fill cattle tank twice a day so it doesn't freeze up.  Or what combination of fittings does one use to make something up.  I'll be draining 75 feet of 5/8" hose.

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7 Replies
Jim Meade / Iowa City
Senior Contributor

Re: Blow water from hose

What would you use to blow it out, air?  A venturi system like is used on an air gun might work but ti might take a lot of air.

Can you let the hose trickle so in most weather it wouldn't freeze up?  Can you suspend it higher in the middle or one end so all the water drains easily and you could just open a valve?  Can you wrap a heat tape around it?  Sorry I don't have better ideas.

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nwobcw
Advisor

Re: Blow water from hose

  A friend I was showing how to do chores if I was away or something suggested blowing it  out with an air compressor.  At 75 feet of hose I figure it'll take a lot of air and a tight seal between the air nozzle and the hose.  I've been doing it the old fashioned way for years.  Non-farmers think all we do is sit in an conditioned cab all day.  It makes me chuckle when they are surprised by all the behind the scenes action.  I can't wait till he helps me replace all the wearable iron on the planter.  That should be a riot.  Ha!

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Nebraska Sandhiller
Frequent Contributor

Re: Blow water from hose

Your farm supply store should have a fitting with hose therads on one end, and pipe threads on the other end. then get some pipe bushings and a air hose fitting. If you don't find the fittings in the garden hose section, look in the sprayer fittings.

 

Going to take lots of air to get it all out, one low spot, and it will be froze up.  You could get fittings to hook it up to a propane bottle to blow it out.  That could be a little hard on the hose and also the newer bottles may have a excess flow valve in them that won't let much volume out.  The better solution would be if you could do as the other poster said, and support it so one end or the middle was higher so it would drain on its own.  Possibly run it through a pipe or fasten to a 2x4, to keep from having low spots.  I just let my water run, and the tanks always stay open and the cows drink more water.

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nwobcw
Advisor

Re: Blow water from hose

You're right on lots of air and 1 low spot gumming up the works.   Think I'll keep doing it the old way.  At least I won't have any surprises to greet me in the morning.

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DaveVB
Frequent Reader

Re: Blow water from hose

I do it all the time with longer hoses than that for winter storage. Wrap a rag around your blower nozzle and blow it out, not a biggie. Try it once, doesn't take as much air as you think. Put a double valve "Y" on the supply end, you won't even have to disconnect, then too, the hole is smaller you could use one of those rubber tip blowers.

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nwobcw
Advisor

Re: Blow water from hose

Thanks  I'll give it a try

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hardwayfarmer
Veteran Contributor

Re: Blow water from hose

I thought we were done draining barn hoses for the spring, but...

I have old wooden pulleys suspended from beams in the cattle and hog barn.  I pull the hoses through the pulleys to drain them when I'm done watering the stock.  If it's going to be super cold, then I take the hoses to the house and put them on the enclosed back porch.  I have been known to toss them in the basement too.

 

A couple of falls ago I made an adapter to blow out my wife's garden hoses when we put them away for the winter.  The hardware store had a male garden hose to pipe coupler. That and a couple of reducer bushings brought it down to the size of a 1/4" female pipe that I could screw an air coupler fitting in.  I screw the adapter into the water hose and then plug it into the air line.  Makes a fine spectacle as the water gushes out the other end and whips the hose around.  Coincidentally, this adapter also fits the boom lines on my field sprayer, so I take all the nozzles off the booms and blow those lines out, too, in the fall.  I wouldn't want to have to drag my barn hoses to the shop two or three times a day all winter and start the air compressor to blow them out, though.  I'll stick with the pulleys on the beams for them.

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