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Contributor

New Shop Ideas

1

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8 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

There are quite a few threads on this topic, both in Shop and in Buildings and Bins.

The main thing is, what do you want to do in the shop?  The better you answer that the more you will define what **bleep** will look like.

 

I have a heated floor and really like it.  An extra heater would be nice if you will open the doors a lot in the winter to take the chill off, as the heated floor has a long recovery time.

 

I ran all my air, water, electric and so forth as surface mount.  I want to be able to get at it if there is a problem.  Takes a little planning, but not much more than if you run it in the walls.

 

Don't skimp on the lighting.  You may want some lights that turn on quickly and some for when you just want to duck in and pick up a wrench and get out right away.

 

I have an overhead door that I use a lot and a bifold that I use very seldom in the winter.  Drive-through, but the overhead is offset so I can park equipment on one end of the shop.   If you put the door right in the middle, then sometimes you can't park an item without it blocking the drive-through.

 

You might put the air compressor up high in a corner and even plumb the intake outdoors to keep noise down (but do it right).

 

I have a floor drain in the end where I park the pickup.  I would not put any other drain in.  I put some anchors into the floor so I can tie down or weld to them, but haven't used them much.  I would not use a pit in a shop your size.

 

I did not put a crane in my shop and a very much wish I had put a jib crane in.  with a heated floor, I can't do it now.  I really recommend at least a jib crane if not an overhead beam and trolley arrangement.  Put an electric or air winch on it.

 

Make sure the entrnce is designed so wind can not drive water in under the door.

 

Midwest Plans Service has plans for a shop, but they are pretty generic.

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

when you do the heated floors, you run plastic pipe in under the cement, right? Do you have extra pipe installed in case a pipe starts to leak? do you have a manifold that runs the water through each pipe , so you can shut down a leaky pipe if one bursts? or is this not a concern? I always wonder about how people tackle this. I am thinking about a new shop too, and hear people swear by heated water floor heat.

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Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

Each pipe is PEX and is the same length.  It runs to a manifold for even distribution.  I had my plumber do the computer program that drew the layout, and my teenage daughter helped me install it.  The outside few lines are 6" apart and the rest 12".  There are some things to know about the re-rod, the insulation underneath, how deep to put the PEX and so forth.  Rat walls are a good idea.

 

I put the two drains in (I would only use one if I did it over) and I put in a tie-down.  It was a 6" I beam buried flush with the floor, about 10 feet long, with a box on each end and in the box a way to hook a chain.  A lid at floor level covers the box.  I can either hook a chain to the eyes or I can weld somethng to the beam, then cut it off and grind it level when done.  This is so I can use jacks etc to bend an iron or whatever.

 

If you use a jib crane, you will need to bury a big chunck of concrete before you pour the floor.  I did not do this and wish I had.  I am using a gantry crane which is nice but a jib crane is so much handier.  My mistake.  If doing it over, I'd bury the deadman even if I didn't put the crane on yet.  I'd also bury some anchors so when the time came, I could simply bolt the crane down.

 

The re-rod will help keep the concrete from cracking and should hold the PEX in place.  I have not heard of any tubing breaking, but am not real experience, either.

 

My plumber uses a hot water heater for the heat.  It runs all the time and has no anti-freeze.  The plumber says that even if iI lose the heater, the concrete will act as a heat sink for a couple of days or more if something goes wrong and I have to make repairs.

 

I have 6" insulation in the walls and at least 12" overhead.  I insulated both doors with 2" foam.

 

I like hot water heat because it is not drafty.  I run my heater all year long at 50 degrees, never shut it off.  In the winter, after about 15-20 minutes of activity, it's warm enough to work with no coat or hat.  The heat at the floor is the same as at the ceiling.   I don't open the big door very often in the witner.  I think if I did, I'd need to add an auxiliary heater because the floor heat recovery time can be quite long.

 

If I were doing it over, I'd ask about putting some PEX in the concrete pad outside the doors so they melted off.  No big reason, but I'd check it out.

 

I was drilling anchors into the concrete and hit a PEX.  It took me aobut 2 hours to did it out, put in a union and reseal it with some grout to level it.  Not a big deal.  Not something I'd want to do all the time, but not a big deal.  If I was thinking about bolting some things to the floor, I'd pour the anchors right in with the concrete.

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Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

Jim,

Just curious if your water heater is gas or electric.  Electric would be cost prohibitive here in SE WI and most guys use a high efficiency boiler for floor heat in shops.  I just hooked up my floor heat in our newer house - to our propane hot water heater.  It works well heating the basement floor and runs maybe 5-6 hours per day.  About 2.5 hours in the morning and the same about 12 hours later.  I put a programmable thermostat on it to shut it off between 6 and 9, both am/pm so it's not running during shower time since it holds at about 100 degrees when it's in full floor circulate mode.  We have a 40 gal tank heater and as near as I can figure at 40,000 btu's per hour that's about 0.45 gal propane per hour.  I think that's correct (?).  So if your heater is running full-time for the shop what kind of heating bill do you have?  When I get my shop floor heated I'm going to go the boiler route and likely send a line to the house, too, since the shop is only 100' away.  Outdoor wood burners send heat further than that so why not let the shop heat the house, too.  Would like to know what your economics are.

Thanks!

Tom

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Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

I use a gas water heater.  It's on with the house LP tank and I don't have a separate meter.  Sorry I'm not of more help.

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Advisor

Re: New Shop Ideas

   I haven't built one nor do I plan to but the most common complaint I've heard from people that have is "I shudda made it bigger".

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Frequent Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

I just put up a 46 x 70 x 16 eve height shop.  It is an all steel building.  Went that route because I didn't want trusses in the way and I could put a 16 ft high door on it.  Could not do it with a truss bldg. 

 

Have 2 heavy overhead insulated doors on it.  They are commercial grade doors and are very heavy built.  Did not want to put up a good building and have cheap doors on it.  Have not put in heat yet but am thinking will go radiant tube heat.         

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Contributor

Re: New Shop Ideas

45 is too narrow.

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