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Senior Advisor

New Shop

I will be building a new farm shop for maintenance only.  This project will get started in about a year, but I want to gather information now so I can take my time with plans and incorporate all the different features that make a good farm shop.  I haven't taken my measuring wheel to the location yet, but just eyeballing the area it seems it will be somewhere around a 40' x 60' with either a 18' or 20' sidewall.  I know the door openings are going to be on the west and south side of the building with the length of the building running east and west.  The shop will be used a lot during the winter months, so I am leaning towards heat in the floor.  I want the doors to be large enough for future expansion, but not to large to be overkill.  Any suggestions are welcome, any features you have incorporated or wish you had are all greatly appreciated.

38 Replies
Veteran Contributor

Re: New Shop

Think bigger is my only suggestion for now.  Think of it this way, if you have a 12 row planter in a 40 x 60 you don't have any way to fold it out hooked to a tractor.  40' depth isn't deep enough with tractor and 40' width ways doesn't leave you much room for benches and room to walk around.

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Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

I know I want to go as large as I can, but with the location it is going to be placed, it will need to stay roughly this size.  I haven't actually measured the location with my wheel yet, but I am planning on the largest steel building that will fit on this site.  Another question I have is, if I want a 20' side wall, is it better to have a 20' building or a 2' stem wall with an 18' sidewall building?  I am leaning towards a hydraulic hydro swing door for west side of building, is this a good choice or are there better options available?  I would rather spend a little extra at construction time and not be wishing for something different at completion time.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: New Shop

go with a bifold door for a swinging door, just like at the airport, the door folds up and out of the way.  If you are doing a steel building then I think you could get by with just a concrete footer all the way around that is a foot higher than your ground, unless you think you'll have a drainage problem, then you might want to consider having the higher stem wall.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: New Shop

20' sidewalls for sure. 

In-floor heat is great.  We've been told one guy extended the floor heat outside each door to avoid snow/ice build-up.  I'm assuming that was walk-in door.  Something to think about.

Floor drains by the drive-in door/s for ease of cleaning.

Plenty of air hose.

Plenty of light - combo of windows (natural) and fixtures (artificial).

Utility sink. 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

I know I'm going with 20' sidewalls for sure, but I'm not sure if I want to use a stem wall with a shorter building to attain the 20' height.  Fortunately I've got a next door neighbor that has his own concrete business, so I know he will bid me a good price on the concrete work,.  I was already thinking of heated floors on all outside concrete pads including sidewalks, I was told to put them on a separate bank coming off the heated manifold so they could be isolated when not needed.  My next research will be on what type of lighting to use.  Does anyone use skylights anymore or is that something of the past?  Definitely going to use a single fold hydraulic swing door for the smaller one on the main entrance.  The larger door on the side I'm not sure if I need the more expensive door because it will not be used near as much.

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Contributor

Re: New Shop

Floor heat is useful for reasons other than keeping you warm. If you wash a piece of equipment inside the shop, the water on the floor goes away in a very short time due to evaporation. This allows you to wash equipment in weather that would prohibit such a thing outdoors. We don't even have a floor drain and yet can still wash equipment indoors.

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timfarn
Senior Reader

Re: New Shop

Definitely go with the kneewall, they are especially helpful with cleanup and maintenance within a shop.  They are economical, you will have a spread footing anyway; consider pouring above the floor in even increments (2' or 4', depending on slope).  The even increments get you to the building eave height without material waste - typically materials come in even increments. 

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Veteran Contributor

Re: New Shop

We've got just a small stem wall that works fine.  Ask your concrete buddy what he recommends. 

Definitely recommend sealing the concrete with a couple coats of water or solvent based sealer.  Really helps with dust control, clean-up of oil spills and faster moisture drydown.

Only concern with skylights might be water penetration.

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

Thanks for the info.  That should work right into my plans.  I was actually considering an 18' building sitting atop of a 2' stem wall.

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