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Senior Advisor

Re: Shop tips

I have sort of put my planning activities on the back burner for now.  Farming is about to get going and that is first and foremost right now.  The shop project isn't going to break ground for approximately a year or so I've still got a little time.  I have found the advice from other contributors to be very helpful, especially concerning the stem wall and the style of door.  Thanks for the top shops link, I'm sure it will beneficial as well.  I'll keep posting if I have anymore questions.

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Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

If you go with in-floor heat, which I have and love, for sure plan your jib crane and any other bases carefully.  You dont' want to be drilling into the floor with the pex lines running all over.  I'd pour some big pads with the floor and mark them carefully so you know where you can bolt on.

In-floor heat has very slow recovery - if you are going to open and close your doors a lot, consider a curtain to hold most of the heat in and consider a small recovery heater.

Put in an air conditioned office.

Consider envirionmental protection for moisture control, sound, humiditiy and so forth.

Make sure it is fairly easy to service your lights.  Lights on a 20' ceiling are not easty to get to, especially as you get older.

If you have a ton of money, put in a traveling crane.

Consider a car hoist big enough for the pickup, at least.  It's so much faster, neater and cleaner to work on small vehicles.

I would minimize floor drains.  But, maybe put one under the place you'll bring equipment or vehicles in so they melt off and drain in the winter.

Consider septic and waste water and other polution issues up front so they don't bite you later on an inspection or sale.

I surface mounted all my air, electric and water.  Easy to get to.

Do not use PVC for air unless you protect it.  Copper is easy to work.  Use big air lines as they add a lot of reserve capacity.  Plumb the intake and exhause of the air compressor outside to dramatically reduce noise.

Run all your plans by your insurance agent and if you have a friendly fireman, ask him to comment on flammable storage, etc.  Always have an escape hatch no matter where  you are in the shop.

You say you need a west door - not the best in the winter but I'm sure you have thought of that.  My shop has doors on eacfh end so I can drive a long vehicle right through.  One is a 20' bifold (Hifold) and the other is a 12" overhead.  I offset the overhead so that I can park and work on wide equipment on that end and not lose the ability.  In other words, it's pretty well on one side of th end.  I like it.

I have HiFold bifold doors.  16' opening on a 16' ceiling.  Most of the othrs cost you a couple of feet of headroom.  Mine is electric.  It is fairly slow.  By the time I got done insulating mine and sheeting it inside and out, it was about at engineered load bearing capacity.  So, think about anyweight (like siding) that you add to the door.

Consider what you line the shop with for easy of maintenance, cleanliness and fire resistance.

Plan on twice the electricity you want and then double it.  Put in 4 outlet boxes on two separate circuits.

Plan on using a lot of battery operated tools, so have a good battery recharge plan set up, not one that takes up every available outlet.

You want air and electricity available readily, so some may drop down from the ceilitng.

Put welder outlet drops wherever you will need the 220.  I hve 3 and that is not enough.

Consider putting Cat 5 in the walls, even though it is a little outdated, you want to be able to get any signal.  I don't know what to say about getting cell phone coverage in the metal shop.  Mine is so-so.  I have a cordless phone so I can use it and walk around a machine while talking to the parts desk.  A corded phone is handy if you lose power.

I put nearly all my manuals on computer and my iPad.  You'll want one of each in the shop.   And a printer because sometimes paper is better.

Get everybody's ideas on built-in shelving, work benches and storage.

That's all I can think of.  Wish I'd done it all myself but I'm not unhappy with mine. 

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tlueth
Reader

Re: New Shop

Have you built your shop? I am in the planning stage now and reading this trend is very helpful. Have you seen these doors at hpdoors.com? Their stand alone video is very impressive.
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Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

I haven't started building just yet, but that is my goal for 2013.  Even if I don't get it completed, I sure would like to get the main structure erected with heat completed.  I can always work on the interior during the winter months next year.  Thanks for the heads up on the doors, I will check it out.

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Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop

What does a shop cost? Ballpark figure for a 60x60x16 with heated floor and kneewall like you guys mentioned? Decent pad out front to work outside for quick repairs. I am still in wish list mode for one about like that. I've not checked with any builders for fear they wouldn't leave me alone and my mailbox would be full of flyers and nonstop junk from them.
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Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop

I'm guessing it'd be $80,000-$100,000 by the time I'd buy lights, doors, large compressor and plumbing, and box a corner off for an office and bathroom. Like building anything, costs add up quick and go way over estimates before you know it.
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Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

My brother-in-law put up an 80x80 3 years ago.  Not sure on the sidewall, but it is tall, probably 18 or 20 ft.  He spared no expense, heated floor, lots of aprons outside, office, loft, full bath, state of the art lights and several doors.  He has over $150,000 invested.  Not sure how much over that.

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Senior Contributor

Re: New Shop

I am in the stage Shaggy was in back when this thread started -- shopping and planning a shop/work area. I was looking back through the old buildings' threads and found this one that hit close to home.

 

My question is the same as SteeringWheelHolder asked last Jaunary -- approximate cost of a 60X60 or 60X40 building. "Frills" I am interested in are insulation, cements floor (with or without heat), one overhead door and 3 walk in doors and several windows.

 

The wood vs. steel farme choice is still up in the air.

 

I am close to retiring and this is going to be my shop/getaway/play area near my house so I don't get in the guys' way in the "real shop."

 

Thanks for any help. BTW how far has your shop project getten, Shaggy

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Highlighted
Senior Advisor

Re: New Shop

Embarrassed to say, but my shop plans are still on the back burner. Since I started this thread some time ago, certain circumstances have changed and my shop is still on hold. Not canceled, just moved back a little farther. Since my shop is just a shop and not necessary for off season storage, I believe my plans are easier to keep in the on deck circle vs someone who needs storage to get equipment out of the weather.
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Veteran Contributor

Re: New Shop

If this is to be a shop, with I would assume a concrete floor, it is no dought you should use a steel building. The cost difference between steel and wood is mainly in the trench footing and curb. If you are having a concrete floor most of that cost, other than the trench footing is also in the wood. You can save some serious money if you are willing to do some work. Putting layers of 2" polystyrene ( the pink stuff ) in the ceiling and walls give an unbeleivable R value and also no air infiltration. The best way to bo the ceiling is after the purlins are up run the liner steel and then install the pink board from the top. When you quit for the day just make sure you have the boards weighted down. Makes a warm tight building. Heating and cooling should be done with a ground source heat pump. What ever the HVAC contractor says about too costly and takes a huge system, don't believe them a 60X70 ave 12Ft ceiling building insulated the way I said took 163 KW in a 36 day period from 6-12-13 to 7-16-13. Total cost 13.47 and $6 of it was service charge.  Cooled to 71 degrees F. Don't yet know what the heating costs will be. Find out this winter. We use a 5 ton unit and for cooling that is way overkill. 

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