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Advisor

bent pallet fork

I abused one side/fork of my pallet fork on a loader. I know they are very hard and tough stuff. talked to local welder and he said they are dangerous to straighten but he would look at it. told me I would likely have to buy one new fork. It is bent at the angle where the fork goes from vertical to horiz. any advice??  One of my friends calls this "dumb tax".

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Veteran Contributor

Re: bent pallet fork

i work on forklifts for a living and we cant straighten forks for the liability reasons, i tell my customers how they can tho. it is at a hard place to straighten tho maybe a lot of heat. if it is a normal fork lift fork maybe a used fork parts yard can help you. if you go to a local fork lift dealer  tell em you want aftermarket . i have seen some welded after they broke it that place  i don t like that idea

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Advisor

Re: bent pallet fork

Local welder straightened it in an 80 ton press. he puts chains around it to try and stop the pieces from flying if it breaks while straightening.

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Contributor

Re: bent pallet fork

 

 

I've had mine straitened before by the local blacksmith.  They were only bent a few inches when measuring at the tip.  He told me to stop moving downed trees with my forks.

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Contributor

Re: bent pallet fork

My last off farm employer tried every shortcut with forks and every time they tried having them straightened, they would snap.  Sometimes with as light as a 400# pallet, sometimes it took a few days of 4500# pallets.  I would NEVER trust a pallet fork that has been straightened if a second person will ever be working around the mast or loader it is attached to.

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Advisor

Re: bent pallet fork

I can't vouch for the safety of this, but after bending my fork at the same spot, I heated the fork until cherry red, and then bent it back into shape. I took 2 propane torches..and put them under the fork and left them burn for about half an hour...then took a big welding tip in my acetylene torch...and heated it up to cherry red. It didn't take much to bend it after that..I even jumped on the end and bent it back a little after going too far pushing down on a block. I let it cool slowly..with just the propane torches burning till they ran out of fuel...it hasn't broken yet after using it on 3000 lb. pallets of seed. I suppose you just have to make sure you follow a few simple rules....like don't get under the forks when they have weight on them....that's really a no-brainer any way.

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