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Senior Contributor

How's the hog business treating you?

Smiley Very Happy  With hogs in the profitable range surely we can find something to talk about.   

 

Bean meal down,  corn down,  fuel down and hog prices UP! 

 

It has taken almost a year for us to get through conception problems.   My farrowing house is FULL!   My nursery is FULL!   Finishing buildings and lots are not fullSmiley Sad

 

The past week I have been overflowing with farrowing gilts.   I finally weaned a room a couple days early on Thursday.  By Friday afternoon the crates were filled.    I even have 6 litters in pens with straw.   Unfortunately,  they are laying on more that I would want or expect in the pens.     

 

Now if I only had full finishing buildings so we could take advantage of  these prices.    

9 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

Are the sows in the pens with newborns or with older pigs? When we were overflowing, we would take the older litters to the pens. Didn't have many dead ones.

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Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

I let the gilts farrow in the pens.   Whenever I tried to take out litters from the crates the layons  was absolutely terrible.   I find if I let the gilts,  (and I prefer gilts), farrow in the pens  then both they and the pigs learn early.   The worse layons occured this time because I was out of crates and pens so I put 2 litters / 3 days old, together in one bigger pen.   That way another  gilt could pig in the empty pen. 

 

Once they  have farrowed in farrowing crates  and in the farrowing room, squealing pigs mean absolutely nothing to them.   I get to remember what it is like to deal with protective and mean sows  again.  Plus,  it always is raining  when I have baby pigs and  the pens to tend to get wet.... so... back to the pitchfork. 

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Honored Advisor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

Glad the conception problems are worked out now.  That bodes well for the winter, I hope. 

 

We've gotten nice pigs and they have grown well for a good long spell now.  Our farrowing farm is now a company farm, and they are doing a great job! 

Mike's doing a big repair/interior reconstruction pass on the farm right now, so he's beat those evenings when he's had an empty house to work on for the day.  Other than that, it's a great year. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

We'd move the sow and litter out after they were 10 days old. The pigs were usually quick enough to get out of the way of their mother. Are your pens on dirt or concrete? The pens also had solid floors so the footing was steady.

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Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

The pens are OLD.  We used them 30 years ago!   Concrete floors,  wood gates that are patched several times,   Creep area at one end.  Pens are probably 4'x8'.    Sows are turned out to feed and water daily.   Pens number 1-5 and sows are marked with marking chaulk with the corresponding number.   If it rains really hard and fast I get to go out and clean pens. 

 

My experience was that once the sow had pigged in the farrowing crate/house.  She won't get up when she hears a sqealing pig if I put her in a pen with straw. 

 

Since they are now over 6 days old  the layons have stopped.   i've got about a 8.5 pig average.  I'm getting  ready to turn the sows out permanently to the shedded area and let the pigs run under the gate to get away for a creep area.   Less work and time demand.  Right now I have to turn them out and then put in every afternoon.  Kind of blows my day. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

That sounds like the way my parents raised hogs 45 years ago. No wonder you aren't happy with all the work. Then 25 years ago they had 4x10 huts with a 8x10 concrete pen in front. Water fountains were in the pen, all you had to do was feed them daily. That was where they would put the 10 day old litters. They didn't use straw in the huts; only wood chips. Dad claimed that they didn't need more than a straw sheaf. If they had more, the pigs could be buried too easily.

That is a great litter average. You should be proud of the results of your time and effort. We can only hope that the prices stay profitable when the pigs are ready.

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Advisor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

About feb. realized that my only group of sows had NOTHING bred. (i'm a little slow, sometimes. turned boar in during harvest from hell and fed them in the morning darkness. that's the excuse i'm goiing with.) having no chores was hard at first, but every day is like vacation. really. I take our new dog for a walk every morning about 6.  with this recent  rainy spell was thinking about how I started everyday checking outside feeders to see if they were caked up. kneeling to work with a pig biting me in the butt. I miss the feeeders banging and selling hogs.  better go walk with the pup the monster thunderstorm will be here soon.

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Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

Is KEN still short copper?

Parabolic formation.

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Senior Contributor

Re: How's the hog business treating you?

Not in the bis but I do like pork.

 

Is ken still in hogs or did the downturn knock him out.

 

art

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