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Veteran Contributor

I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

They just don't like to bed down in it.

To feel at home, pigs must also be able to exercise

their rooting instincts. 

 

Pigs are not as vile as many people might think. 

They are quite clean in the wilds. 

 

http://naturalpigfarming.com/

 

I quote: 

 

"The natural pig farming system costs a fraction of what it costs to set up and raise pigs kept in conventional sties or modern intensive factory systems. We raise healthier and more productive pigs simply through respecting their welfare and behavioral needs and the positive power of nature. This approach delivers significantly higher profit per pig than any conventional intensive pig raising system."

 

 

I don't like all those dam hogs that are overly fat. I am a fan of leaner pork. 

I bought several spiral hams in the past that had so much fat in them it was not even funny.

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29 Replies
Senior Advisor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.


@JonBailey64 wrote:

They just don't like to bed down in it.

To feel at home, pigs must also be able to exercise

their rooting instincts. 

 

Pigs are not as vile as many people might think. 

They are quite clean in the wilds. 

 

http://naturalpigfarming.com/

 

I quote: 

 

"The natural pig farming system costs a fraction of what it costs to set up and raise pigs kept in conventional sties or modern intensive factory systems. We raise healthier and more productive pigs simply through respecting their welfare and behavioral needs and the positive power of nature. This approach delivers significantly higher profit per pig than any conventional intensive pig raising system."

 

 

I don't like all those dam hogs that are overly fat. I am a fan of leaner pork. 

I bought several spiral hams in the past that had so much fat in them it was not even funny.


Trust me, if you have pigs you will have mud if you want it or not.

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Senior Contributor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

You have overdosed on those pills again.  I run a fully intensive piggery after having one of those warm and cuddly outdoor things.  You might feel good about it but I guarantee you non profit is guaranteed. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

I think in general the pigs that are raised for niche and specialty markets tend to be fatter.

And while I'd agree the investment is less per sow for a pasture system (if you include land rent as a variable cost and don't include land cost as part of the fixed cost/investment).  I think sustainable agriculture proponents downplay the investments to get involved in farming be that hobby, niche, or even commodity.  It is a very expensive proposition, investment wise, to have an enterprise that provides full time employment whether that would be a pasture pig operation or even a contract hog finishing operation.  

Minus the land, throw me out a number that would be required to start a full time pastured pig operation not counting the land.  I have a number that I'll share after others share.   But I think the biggest barrier to entry into niche pig production is the skills required.  Very few people have the animal husbandry skills to put together an operation of any scale that cooperates with nature that is labor efficient and animal productive.  I used to underestimate that requirement until I've tried to hire employees to take care of pigs on pasture.  

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Veteran Contributor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

Skills required. That is why we have UC Davis in California. Ag ed. 

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Veteran Contributor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

agriculture should not be complex

 

It is bacon, hash browns and eggs on the consumer's plate in the morning, not rocket science. 

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Senior Advisor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

Go ahead and get that Ag degree from UC Davis, let's see where that gets you. What a joke.
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Senior Contributor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

I disagree. Building a pasture livestock operation is complex. Pasture pig production is entirely about replacing capital and labor with management. Awful lot of biology, chemistry, mathematics, economics, etc in what we do. Awful lot more management and understanding of the animal than required in confinement operations. I could have built rockets for NASA but I chose to raise, process, and market pastured livestock instead.
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Senior Contributor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

I was good friends with Desmond Jolly at UC Davis. We served on USDA small farm commission together. Very good institution of higher learning. I use science, math, English, economics, etc daily. College is about a learning process more than skills but that's my opinion. I have a degree on the wall from Purdue.
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Veteran Advisor

Re: I am not a confirmed mud man, but pigs do need some, I must confess.

John Bailey, their is more involved than what you think. Pasture pig outfits look nice and friendly until its January, and -10 degrees, and those happy pasture raised pigs are not so happy, some die. You will have fun raising hogs in the winter with frozen ground and ice for water. You may not have this problem in California, but you will see why most of the livestock in this country are raised in the Midwest when you pay a premium for that Nebraska corn that had to be railed several hundred miles to get to your hogs.

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