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Veteran Contributor

Re: Ask the Expert - Nutrient Management

Could a variable rate fertilizer program be one way farmers cut could back on N costs without having negative consequences?

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Re: Ask the Expert - Nutrient Management

Variable rate is an excellent addition to a nutrient management plan, but off there is no total savings on the cost of nutrients. It can have a large impact, however, on the profitability of each acre. Utilizing crop removal to better distribute the nutrients on the field ensures lower nutrients applied in lower areas and the higher rates in higher yielding areas which removed more. This helps to better get costs in check for the level of yield potential. Total nutrient costs are likely neutral, but profitiability of the field is raised.

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Re: Nutrient Management- Question

Nitrogen recommendation modeling has progressed quite a bit in the last few years, but even with these systems, ground truthing is a significant component of the recommendations. Soil test levels and crop removal, as well as overall yield goals continue to play a fundamental role in understanding the nutrient balance and making adjustments.

 

There is more data available than ever before that can help producers and their advisors make informed decisions. And it is easier than ever before to move that data. Just a few years ago that data movement was cumbersome, often requiring thumb drives or flash cards to transfer. We all have a propensity to put off that task and wait to download our harvest data until the end of the year. By the time we complete harvest, download the data, transfer to our agronomist, and get back a recommendation, it may be too late to utilize those insights for fall fertilizer applications.

 

With our connected world today, data flow and insight generation is much more fluid. John Deere machines can be connected to the Operations Center wirelessly, transferring the data in near real-time, with no cumbersome drives or cards. Even some non-Deere displays can have data transferred to and from the Operations by using Mobile Data Transfer.

 

Once that data is in the Operations Center, you have the ability to create partners that need access to that data and allow them access. Imagine, you complete harvest of a field and with no effort on your part, the data is uploaded to the Operations Center. Your agronomist, that you have setup as a partner, is instantly able to access the information, analyze it, and create a prescription. In a matter of days, that prescription can be provided to you to execute a variable rate application with a machine in your fleet, or to your ag service provider to apply for you.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: Nutrient Management- Question

How does satellite imagery or drone-generated NDVI maps play into nitrogen application decisions? Are these replacing soil testing? Or should they be used in combination with ground truthing just like a modeling program?

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Re: Nutrient Management- Question

Soil tests still are a fundamental piece of any nutrient management plan, as they give that snapshot of the soil fertility status. Satellite and drone imagery are useful tools to enhance the ongoing monitoring of the plant health in season. Understanding what fertility is available from the soil and how the crop is accessing that nutrient are both critical for a solid understanding. An area of the field that is showing a lack of nutrients doesn't necessarily mean that sufficient nutrients are not available in the soil - there could also be challenges with uptake or other factors at play. But in can definitely give insight for the areas to take a deeper look.

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Re: Ask the Expert - Nutrient Management Signing off

Thanks for all of the great questions. I am signing off for now, but will be checking back in later today and the coming days for any further questions.

 

Before I sign off, I did just want to remind everyone again of the breadth of solutions that John Deere offers to apply nutrients effectively and efficiently, and the tools we offer to manage your data flow and generate better insights to improve your profitability. Your local John Deere dealer has the expertise to work with you on your operation.

 

Thank you all, and have a good day!

 

Doug Felter

Product Marketing Manager

John Deere.

Contributor

Re: Ask the Expert - Harvest Data

My name is Tyler Hogrefe and I am a Senior Technical Product Manager for John Deere’s Intelligent Solutions Group in Des Moines, IA. I invite you to an Ask the Expert discussion Friday December 11, 2015 from 8:00 – 10:00 AM where I will be answering questions about harvest data and how it can be used to improve your business decisions.

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Re: Ask the Expert - Harvest Data - Good Morning!

Good morning, my name is Tyler Hogrefe and I am a Senior Technical Product Manager for John Deere’s Intelligent Solutions Group in Des Moines, IA. I will be available for the next two hours to answer any questions you have around your yield data and how it can be used to make more effective business decisions for your operation. Harvest is critical to evaluating the performance of your operation; making use of that information and insight has the opportunity to reduce business risk and improve profitability. If you have questions or would like to discuss harvest information, feel free to reply

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Re: Analyzing Harvest Data

Question: What are the key aspects of gathering and analyzing harvest data at home, that is, without giving the data to some other organization?

 

Answer: If you are looking to gather and analyze agronomic information by yourself, you should consider the following five steps to get the most out of your information.

 

  1. Pick a software solution: Before you begin to gather and analyze agronomic information, you need to select a software package to store and analyze your information, as an example the John Deere Operations Center. Carefully evaluate your goals around data and seek out the software package and support that best meets your individual needs.
  2. Gather the data: Find the best way to gather all of the information you are collecting in the field. Historically, growers have moved data via a USB stick from the machine to the office, but that approach has always had its fair share of challenges, like losing the USB stick. There are a variety of new ways you can now move data from the field to office. John Deere provides three approaches to moving data that you can choose from based on your unique needs. The three options for moving data include: JDLink Connect, Harvest Mobile and Mobile Data Transfer. Each option provides you the ability to wirelessly move data from the machine to John Deere Operations Center. The JDLink product is the most automated and seamless of all the options as it doesn’t just move the agronomic data, it will also move the machine and logistics information for you to use in the John Deere Operations Center.
  3. Ensure your data is accurate: Once your data is in your software of choice, make sure it is accurate. Making decisions with information you don’t know to be accurate can negatively impact your business, so take the time to ensure your data accurately reflects what really happened in the field. This includes, but is not limited to, ensuring your product names are correct, data is associated to the right field, yield totals align with scale tickets, crop season is correct, and crop type accurate.
  4. Analyze the data for insights: When you are comfortable with the quality of the data, find the right tools to explore what happened throughout the crop season. Having your seeding and nutrient applications documented and in the software will aide in your ability to determine which factors are driving yield, so consider documenting all operations and not just harvest. The John Deere Operations Center provides easy to use tools like the Summary Tab, Field Analyzer and Agronomic Reports that allow you to turn your data into insights, even if you are new to using agronomic data.
  5. Take action on the insights: After finding insights in the data, you need to be able to put those learnings into practice. The specific action you take in the field is going to depend on the insights gleaned from the data. As an example, your learnings may lead you to realize that you should be optimizing your input placement through the use of a prescription.

If you are looking to start using your agronomic information to improve your business decisions, these five steps will help you make that transition seamlessly.

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Re: Analyzing Harvest Data

Question: Assuming the data is obtained from calibrated equipment and is accurate, does one try to overlay various information layers and look for correlations?

 

Answer: Map layering is one way that growers have traditionally evaluated their data in search of key insights that can help them make better management and input decisions. A key challenge with data layering is interpreting the information. For most people, including myself, they can only stack so many layers on top of each other before it becomes difficult to recognize correlations. It was this challenge that led John Deere to developing tools in the John Deere Operations Center like the Difference Map, Average Yield Map and Compare View where growers can more easily begin to focus on parts of the field that have had significant yield improvements or reversions in the past year compared to how the field has performed historically. This approach helps growers focus their attention on specific parts of the field and allows them to more easily determine the factors that are driving yield in each of their fields.

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