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Case IH MXM 120

I am looking to replace a 5088 IH and I have found a mxm 120 with low hrs and in my price range. I know the mxm 120 will not be as much hp but thats not my worry. I would just like to hear from some people that know these tractors. The pros and cons of them

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11 Replies
Veteran Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

Neighbor has one. Good, solid tractor, does most things very well, but has had a few electrical gremlins that show up from time to time.
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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

   I believe that tractor is similar to the McCormick MC series.  I had electrical problems galore.  I bought it new.  Tach never did work right.  PTO sensors went out, $1500.00.  Switch under seat went out.  I wired around it but lost a day and a half planting figuring it out.  And to top it off the radio would come on by itself, sitting in the shed with the key in the off position.  The dealer said it was impossible but I know what I saw/heard.  Nice tractor otherwise.  I sold it at 1400 hrs. as I was fearful of what might happen next.

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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

I like quite a few features of the MXM155 I own. The engine is the 7.5 liter New Holland motor..the same one that runs forever in all those Ford backhoes?...It seems like it pulls as well as any 1086 ever did, and it should with approximately 42 more cubic inches. It also has an intercooler to keep the motor very efficient. I've been very happy with it's efficiency. The power shift is electronic..and I'm not sure I've completely figured it out yet. I know I should read the book some more..and find out whether there are options to upshift/downshift at the field ends..and whether you can jump the intermediate gears when doing so. If you are tall...I'd be very wary of the cab. The front of the headliner comes fairly close to my head..and I'm only 5'8"...It might be a problem with someone 6'4". I have at least one electrical problem...a hydraulic pressure switch is stuck I believe. And the air conditioning system needs to be fixed...it interacts with an electric clutch of some sort on the fan blade...and when it demands more air movement during an air conditioner cooling cycle...it ramps up the fan speed. Something isn't quite right with it...and I don't think I have the ability to fix it. Something the dealer is going to have to tear his hair out over. It has a reverser...which I find really useful when maneuvering into corners and such...but dangerous the way it's placed on the steering column. I was motoring down a highway one day at about 16 MPH...and grabbed the wrong lever when I wanted to turn my turn signal on. The tractor actually threw the rear tires into reverse at that speed!!!! I think there probably ought to be an interlock that keeps the reverser from working at over 5 MPH..

 

 

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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

  Pup I forgot about the A/C problems on my McCormick.  The 1st thing they did was replace the clutch fan with a fixed fan.  Lost 3 HP on the dyno and didn't fix the problem.  Since the dealer was 135 miles away they agreed to let a local garage work on it under warranty.  This was about 7 years ago now but if I remember correctly he replaced the upper limit switch with something different than the factory type.

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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

nwobcw... the part about the radio is interesting. My combine started doing that this fall and i've walked in the shed and had to turn it off. It's an '02 Tr-99. not sure what make the radio is.

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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

   That is interesting.  My tractor was also a 2002 model.  Most people I have this story to raise an eyebrow.   I figure if it did it when I was right there it must do it other times and shut itself off too.  Do you have other electrical gremlins on your combine?

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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

no other electrical problems at all. this is weird, the key is OFF.  It's really been a good machine, but probably going to trade it.

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Advisor

Re: Case IH MXM 120

  I would always shut the radio off before turning the engine off and the radio would still come on by itself.

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Veteran Advisor

on electrical gremlins

I do all the maintanence, and most of the repairs for myself, and my brothers, so I try to keep up on how to fix things.  One new trend that I really don't like, is that a lot of newer stuff, doesn't switch the power 'off'.  The lead is always 'hot', and to turn things off & on, they switch the ground connections.  For example, I had a neighbor who's late-model combine had the taillights come on in the shed for no reason.  He asked me if I had a theory why.  I told him that on a lot of new stuff, the hot wire is always hot, and the ground wire is now the 'switched' wire.  Turns out he had a mouse in the wiring, and gnawed through the ground wire, and it was touching a bolt or something, completing the circuit.  Could your problems possibly be a ground wire with thin insulation someplace, making contact?

The other thing I am seeing, that I REALLY don't like, is a common 'hot' wire that runs several things, and then separate grounds for individual components, or, worse yet, a computer chip, at the end of a wire, in a little junction, that controls which circuit gets completed via a 'signal' sent down the wire.  I am hearing of a lot of little gremlins in JD combines that are now 2-4 years old or so, having lights turn off & on when you call for the grain cart over the radio, and even one case of the combine just dying once or twice a day, and restarting after you turn the main switch off, and on again (turns out 'shielding' a section of wiring harness cured the problem, took a JD tech half a day to figure it out).

What worries me about this trend, is what happens when the wiring gets older, and those always 'hot' wires get a crack in the insulation, and get into a situation where it can 'spark' every once in a while, but not short out solidly enough to blow the fuse?

 

Anyhow, the point of my long story, is that in about 2/3 to 3/4 of the odd electrical gremlins in new machinery I have seen, tend to involve circuits where the component is turned off and on by switching the 'ground' side, rather than the 'hot' side.  I was curious if your tractor had the same sort of setup?