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Veteran Contributor

Gehl 1310 round baler

Anyone have experience with this model? I am looking at a 1999 model, It is priced cheap so what is the catch?

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Gehl 1310 round baler

Is that the one with the rollers, instead of belts?  We ran an old OMC roller baler many, many years, and they merged with Gehl, but am not sure on the numbering system Gehl used.

If it is the roller style, there are a few things to look at before you bite.


On the left hand side, there is a 'triple' sprocket on one shaft, that is prone to having the gib key working loose, and if you don't catch it in time, it will get loose on the shaft.  Often, the farmer just puts a new bearing on the shaft behind the sprocket, and welds it back on, as the only permanent repair is a new sprocket and shaft stub.

Look at the pickup head VERY closely.  They tend to wear quickly where they hinge on the main baler unit if not greased religiously.  Ditto the pickup fingers.  If not greased religiously, the bushings where the rods the fingers bolt onto will wear out, and the rods will get wobbly.  This has the effect of chewing up the $300 cam on the left hand side of the pickup that actuate the fingers.  It is an all-afternoon job for two guys to replace that cam.

Check the gearbox for looseness.  Some of them didn't have the best venting system on them, allowing moisture in the box.  If the owner didn't check the oil every year, and change it at the first sign of contamination, the bearings would go bad, sometimes chewing up the gears and/or shafts inside.

Verify the little 'hydraulic lock box' holds pressure.  They aren't that expensive to rebuild, but after so many rebuilds, you have to buy the whole valve block, which is pretty pricey.

On the other hand, with the rollers, you don't have to worry about belt tracking, etc, and bearings are very easy and straightforward to change.  The biggest headache is usually getting the sprocket off the left hand side.

Our old OMC went over 100,000 bales, so we have a pretty good idea what wears out on these.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: Gehl 1310 round baler

nebfarmer.

Thanks for the info, you may have saved me a lot of grief!

 

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Re: Gehl 1310 round baler

I might add, if the head appears worn out where it attatches to the baler, or if the rods that hold the pickup fingers seem loose, neither is a terribly 'expensive' fix, if you do the work yourself.  It is more of a 'time consuming' repair, so if you have a mechanic at $90 an hour do the work for you, it will add up fast.

The bushings on the pickup finger rods are cheap, so not a big deal, unless it was run so long on bad bushings that the rods themselves have grooves worn into them.  The cam on the end can be inspected with a flashlight by looking between the slats of the head, in the little grooves where the pickup teeth run.  Raise the head up, and look from underneath, it wears out the fastest on the top front, from the pressure of pushing the hay into the bale chamber.

Also, lower the head down onto the guage wheel.  Does the head look square to the baler?  Often, people don't adjust the stops properly, so if you go into a hole, or over a terrace so that the head falls down to where the stop has to catch it, only the stop on one side will catch it.  Do this enough time, and the head can become twisted, and be crooked to the baler.  If you have to look to see if it is crooked, it will be OK, if it is obvoiusly lower on one side than the other, it will affect the tracking of the pickup head in that $300 cam track I mentioned earlier, and wear it out much quicker than normal.

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