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Senior Contributor

Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

Curious if anyone has had experience with both the Gleaner rotary R series and their newer A series axial flow combine?   The axial flow has less belts and chains and is suppose to require less maintenance.   Always good to hear the saleman's pitch but it would be interesting to hear from a farmer that has actually used both machines.

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7 Replies
Advisor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

Let me just say this...I've never owned nor run either, but I do have a few observations to pass along. The Gleaner axial flow...is basically the old White axial flow..with quite a few obvious improvements. At the time that White built the combine..it had the largest rotor in the industry...and I'm not sure it still isn't right up there with the big Deere's and Case/IH's. What it doesn't have..is a stepped cage..and rotor like the Deere. That might be the single biggest improvement in axial flow technology in the last 25 years. The rotor on the Gleaner though..is driven by a hydrostatic drive...I'm not sure the Deere is...and I don't know if the Case/IH is. The advantage of that...is when it slugs, there's a distinct possibility..you can just reverse it, and back out the slug. Try that with a belt drive rotor!!!. I believe they also have an unloading auger for the axial flow..that pulls grain across the bottom of the bin and elevates it gradually ...as opposed to the verticle auger/turret head style unloading augers of the past. This is a much more efficient design than anyone elses on the market. As far as the R series Gleaners...they speak for themselves. You can't sell a combine that long..that doesn't do something right. The new ones they're making are quite a bit lighter than all the competitive machines...with the same capacity. I don't know if that means they'll wear out sooner or not...but it sure does mean something when you've got a 350 bushel hopper on it..and an 8 row corn head. I believe your subsoil might send you a thank you note. There are plenty of tricks to perform on some of the earlier transverse rotor machines...You just have to get on the right website to find out about them. If I was going to buy a big combine today..It would probably be one of those types..either Massey's axial flow..or Gleaners. I'll never have enough acreage to justify one...but I'm pretty sure they would do the job I ask them to.

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Contributor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

Hey pupdaddy, the new Agco's have been announced & they have pretty much copied the STS rotor & they are now belt driven.

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Advisor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

Wow...I'm definitely behind in my reading..LOL. Glad to see someone is keeping up with the times..LOL.

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

All I can say is this I bought a 1440 in 1982 that was two years old. Ran it for 7500 hours. Every three years it went through inspection and it was bulletproof. I did bulk up the axles thats about it. Have a 2144 other than inspection every two years now it has been bulletproof. My neighbor with brand new deere is broke every other day and so is my bro in law with 9560. Not saying they are bad machines just saying red makes a hell of a combine.

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Advisor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

...I can probably make a comment on Cowfarmer's post that I know a little more about. I had a neighbor that bought a 1440..and he ran the dang thing forever. Took it to a good mechanic for repairs regularly...and I'm sure he had the same kind of hours on it that you had. Right not I've got an old L3 that I'm working on 6000 hours with. I have some repair to get busy with before this fall...but I'm going to make it last another year...

 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

Our 1440 has close to 7000 hours on it.  The engine has not been touched yet, except for a new injection pump/injectors a few years ago.  I think I'm just biding time until it throws a rod or something.

I know of another 1440 with something like 2600 hours on it, that is going to be coming up for sale.  Yes, it needs work, but the 'new' parts it needs, still have a lot of wear to go on the one we are running now.

It follows the rule of KISS (Keep it simple, stupid).  The old Axial-Flows just don't have a lot of moving parts to wear out.  Keep the bushings on the shakers tight, and they run and run and run.  The more chains, drives, shafts, etc you have running, the more potential you have for problems.

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Advisor

Re: Gleaner rotary versus axial flow combine

Oh brother did you say a mouthfull on that KISS rule. I can't believe the engineers think we need a Space Shuttle to harvest corn with. 

 

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