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Contributor

No-Till Drill

I am currently running a CIH 5400 no-till drill with a 5000 CIH coulter cart.  I am having problems getting seed (both wheat and soybeans) at a consistent seed depth.  I don't think the down-pressure springs are heavy enough.  Any suggestions?

 

I am considering trading for a different brand.  Any suggestions?

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

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10 Replies
Advisor

Re: No-Till Drill

   I had a Great Plains and was constantly fiddling with the depth.  Deere's seem to be better at holding it although I never used one.  I switched to a 15" row planter and have not regretted tthe decision.  By their design planters are far better at holding depth than drills.

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Senior Contributor

Re: No-Till Drill

The JD 750 and replacement no-till drills would get the seed into any ground, problem in my opinion they don't always get the seed trench closed.  A real problem in moist clay soils.  I added a second bar and coulters to my coulter cart so there were two wavy coulters per row, spaced about inch apart.  Not sure it would work in the hardest ground, but seems to work in all the clay ground I've got.  But I've never planted in July after a month of no rain.  In those conditions the 750 or siblings would be my choice.

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Advisor

Re: No-Till Drill

I'm going to go with NWO on this one...drills by their nature just don't hold seed depth very well. I've got a 750 Deere...and I can see different depths across the drill with it. Maybe the springs are worn out...but the openers and shoes are all good. I've tried to drill in stuff that was so hard (NW Ohio clay loam in late June) that it wouldn't hardly penetrate....and that's with 4, ten foot long 3x3 inch steel bars laying across the back for additional weight. I guess if I had my drothers....the Deere drill would still be my drill of choice for depth control...but I'm not telling you it's going to beat many of the others in all situations.

 

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Advisor

Re: No-Till Drill

   Pup, I have had a friend tell me that his 750 drill with 10 suitcase weights on it sometimes barely has the tires touching the ground.  After all this rain the ground will be really hard after some 80 degree days and a SW wind.  Lot of corn in and some up around Archbold.

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Contributor

Re: No-Till Drill

In talking to several friends and reading the posts, I think the seed depth issue is just a drilling thing.  Maybe I'm too picky.  Thanks for the help.

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Contributor

Re: No-Till Drill

Where are you located?  I am using a Cross Slot opener on my drill and I find that I get very accurate depth control (I am in Eastern WA).

 

Jon

 

 

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Contributor

Re: No-Till Drill

I've never heard of a Cross Slot opener.  I would like more info.  Thanks!  I'm located in southern Nebraska.

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Contributor

Re: No-Till Drill

The Cross Slot website is:  http://www.crossslot.com/

 

I have been using a 25 foot cross slot drill since last fall.  (after looking at them for around 5 years).  I have pictures on my webiste of seeding I did last fall, I will be posting those crops (which are now quite big) and my new seeding from this spring (hopefully in the next week.  You can see my pictures at:  http://www.dbl-j-farms.com/pictures.htm

 

If you have specific questions, please e-mail me.

 

Jon

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Contributor

Re: No-Till Drill

Is this using both ranks of the drill?  -- 10 suitcase weights may not be enough frame weight in hard conditions.  Also, the hydraulic downpressure needs to be cranked up until you get 2" of compression on the big coil spring on each opener (look at the rod that protrudes out the bottom of the casting as the coil spring is compressed by the torque of the rockshaft).  The rockshaft will have to be sloped down in back by 15 degrees to achieve this much compression of the spring -- this is normal when max dp is needed.

 

Dull opener blades will also make it difficult for the openers to penetrate.  Anything under 17.25" diameter should be replaced.  Note that the bevel should be away from the gauge wheel. 

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