cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
lbedord
Contributor

Stubble Damage To Tires

One of the main topics at the National Farm Machinery Show this past week among farmers was how to control damage to ag tires caused by stubble. Have any of you experienced this problem? How are you solving it on your farm?

 

Thanks!

 

Laurie Bedord

Deputy Machinery Editor

Successful Farming magazine

0 Kudos
18 Replies
Pupdaddy
Advisor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

Aside from waiting till the tire shows cords..and replacing them..I haven't done anything for it yet. I have more stubble damage from soybean stubble chewing up the gaps between the lugs or ribs on tires..than from cornstalks. I've replaced both front tires on a 7120 2wd...that had the cords exposed by stubble chewing the gap between the ribs. The rear tires on the same tractor..have some stubble damage between the lugs..but I think it will last until the lugs are gone far enough to justify replacing them.

0 Kudos
gough whitlam
Senior Contributor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

If  that is the most important topic at some show, farmers have nothing to worry about. 

talk about profitability, exports, subsidies and the influence of China on the American economy.  Spent your time wearing the tractor and the tyres out on making money.  Forget about that type of triviality.

0 Kudos
nwobcw
Advisor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

   My local farm tire dealer suggested buying tires 2 years or more before you will need them.  Take them home, put them inside and let them "harden up".

0 Kudos
idalivered
Advisor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

A  friend of mine priced 8 new tires for his tractor and was in the $20,000 range(18,000-23,000) actually. If this is s trivial figure in australia, life must be good!  I traded my old versatile for a newer one. The newer one had $30,000 worth of new michelins on it, and the old one had maybe 30% . Maybe not the most important issue, but not as unimportant as you would suggest. You're a good debater, but your time is better spent sparring with that half-wit, ollie.

Tags (1)
0 Kudos
idalivered
Advisor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

Good reply. Like you, i was surprised that this was a big issue. I was  at a high school bball game last night and heard 2 other farmers discussing this very topic. It seemed that the bigger problem was the sharp corn stalks that were left when a newer stalk chopping cornhead and healthier gmo corn stalks were used.

0 Kudos
nwsd
Senior Reader

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

there are not stupid questions, only stupid answers like yours!

 

We certainly don't miss your great knowledge at new ag talk.

0 Kudos
gough whitlam
Senior Contributor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

I know a guy who did that. He was not driving them through stubble though.  The tyres shed rubber in small .pieces and lasted no time at all.  It might have been different if they had been new,  What do you think?

0 Kudos
idalivered
Advisor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

I think we have different ideas of what is called "stubble".

0 Kudos
dagwud
Senior Contributor

Re: Stubble Damage To Tires

 

 

Laurie, this stubble damage is a common and expensive problem for most farmers.  We now replace some our tires about twice as often as we did before the advent of BT corn.  Our front drive tire on our combine each run over one row and have been chewed down to cords but only where the tire contacts the row.  The rest of the tire is in very good shape yet.  A couple of years ago we installed May Wes stalk stompers on our corn head over the two rows that run under our drive tires which seems to help.  On our next combine if the tires are not spaced out to avoid running over the rows we will buy spacers to do so.

 

 

Our front wheel drive tractor does all our disc ripping after we have cut the stalks with an old fashioned stalk cutter as opposed to the new corn heads which incorporate some type of cutter system.  In about three seasons our front tires on the tractor are shot even though they have relatively low hours.   I have spoken to several farmers that have had similar problems.  This fall I leased a new FWD tractor for 120 hours with about 80% of the time used pulling the disc ripper and the rest applying NH3.  I power washed and vaccumed out the tractor before returning it to the dealer.  The tractor still looked like brand new but there was already noticable tire damage caused by the corn stubble.

 

 

As Idalivered states this has become an expensive problem as tire prices have gone up considerably in the last 10 years.  I'm curious if the aging of tires to harden them up as the other poster mentioned really works and will ask my dealer as I'm planning on replacing my FWD tires before spring field work.  I was curious if other farmers had better durability from one brand over another?  Years ago before stubble damage became such a big issue I had one dealer tell me that tries to order all his new tractors and combines in with Firestone as he had better luck with them over Goodyear.

 

 

 

I have often wondered if the tire industry like many others has cut cost and is putting out a cheaper quality product then they did in the past.   I have had both a rock and a corn stalk puncture tires on my pickup.

 

 

Mike, you have pretty much summed up Gough.  He loves to call names and if you disagree with him you must be the stupidest thing on earth according to him.  We all knew some kid back in grade school that liked to call names and pick on other kids on the play ground as a way to make himself feel superior.  I'm thinking Gough was one of them that just never grew up.

0 Kudos