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Advisor

Winter driving

I received a press release this morning from a source with the Bridgestone Winter Driving School in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. They're promoting use of winter tires and offering basic tips on winter driving. 

 

The item prompted a memory of literally walking my car through a bad blizzard over Rabbit Ears pass near Steamboat many years ago. Visibility was so bad and the snow so deep that someone had to walk ahead of the car to keep it between the ditches. Basic tip in that case: go real slow.

 

What's the worse winter driving experience you've ever had? Any tips for keeping tractors, pickups, cars and other equipment right side up during winter?

 

Thanks....

 

John

 

 

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5 Replies
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Advisor

Re: Winter driving

Best advice IMHO is leave all them parked and stay home!

One winter I was travelling from Seattle to Iowa, somewhere in South Dakota I was listening to the radio about a pending storm.  I decided to stop when the snow started to fall.  Shortly after thinking this I rounded a long corner, 2 cars in the guard rail and I finished the corner dirt track style at 60 MPH.  The next exit I took at a very slow pace.  Booked my hotel room, walked across the road to retrieve some evening beverages and when I  returned the young lady at the front desk said the booked all the remaining rooms very quickly.  I enjoyed a nice conversation then watched TV and the snow fall for many hours.  Didn't leave until the next afternoon and there were many vehicles in the ditches, mostly 4WD SUV's.  Sure glad I stopped when I did that year, 2001 if I remember right.

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Advisor

Re: Winter driving

    In the winter of '71-'72 I was stationed at Ft. Lee Va.   Every few weeks I would drive home to Ohio for the weekend.  Once on the return trip a bad storm hit just before the exit for Breezewood Pa.  Since I was driving a Z-28 Camaro I knew driving in the snow was impossible so I did as the other poster.   I was AWOL for Monday even after calling in my situation and having a motel receipt.  It's been so long ago I don't remember what punishment, if any, I received.   I was lucky to stop at Breezewwod, the city of motels, gas stations, and restaurants.

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Advisor

Re: Winter driving

 2 years ago. I've had many bad experiences, but ....Left home to the hog buying station with a goose full of market hogs. trip about 35 mi. Light flurries slowly got worse and worse. I got to algona iowa and it was nasty, but what do I do with these hogs? headed west to whittemore iowa (about 6 miles). it was cold enuf('bout zero) and windy enough that the roadway blew clean, but the visibility was almost zero. I could see one yellow line at a time and got the last 3 miles that way. Unloaded and spent the afternoon in a bar in whiitemore. Bad enough that day that the schools held the students and buses from going home. If it hadn't been that cold and I didn't have the load of hogs I would have just stayed in algona or some farmplace along the way. Everyone from iowa , south dakota, or minnesota has several winter driving stories. If we didn't drive in bad weather we'd be home alot.

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Winter driving

Two years ago I was driving home from Indy to Minnesota and they said there was a storm in Iowa. Roads in Illinois were fine but about 1 mile into Iowa there was a car in the ditch. I had my two youngest kids with me so to help pass the time I told them to count how many cars we saw in the ditch. From The Quad Cities thru Iowa City, Cedar Rapids, Waterloo, Mason City to the Minnesota border just south of Albert Lea we counted 254 cars, trucks and semis in the ditch.

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Senior Advisor

Re: Winter driving

Back when I was driving a semi long haul, once on I-80 in Wyoming and once on I-35 in Iowa I encountered a white out.  As an instrument rated pilot, I know all about the disorientation that can arise when you enter the clouds.  I can promise you these white-outs were much more scary than anything I had happend while flying.  I found myyself stopped dead in the middle of the interestate with my foot pushing the brake completely to the floor and with no references to whether I was moving, standing still or what.  A complete white out is terribly disorienting and extremely frightening.  One doesn't know if one is stopped or not, unless you have the presence of mind to check gauges and relate them to what you are doing in the vehicle.

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