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Contributor

international 1086 TA / clutch help?

We need some guidance. We are getting some kind of slippage. We stopped using the ta and that worked for quite a while but now we get slipping on the other side so that solution is no longer enough. We tried a few adjustments but that has not worked out as of yet. From what we can tell it and read in could be the ta or the clutch or the hydraulic pump but no easy answer on how to figure out which! We are not keen on splitting the tractor to replace something that isn't broke either. I believe there is a kit for bypassing the ta. Can that be installed externally without splitting the tractor? There is one source that says most try replacing the ta but it is usually not the real problem.  We have even read about drilling a few holes to install guages for diagnosis-. We are not thrilled with that option either. Everything we get just sends us in circles with no real answers. Any help appreciated. Thanks.

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7 Replies
Advisor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

if the clutch was slipping you ought to be able to smell it (like hot brakes) probably T/A . you got to split it to fix either one so replace both when you do and get one of those heavy duty T/A's so you wont have to do it again

 

 

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

To replace the TA, or to by-pass it will require splitting the tractor.

There is a company that makes a lifetime warrantied TA, for only about $500 more than the standard one that was in there.


However, before you split the tractor, there is a 'shadetree' test you can do, to see if it is truly 'out' or not getting enough hydraulic pressure/flow.   I have been told by many mechanics that 90% of the time, if people would bring it in as soon as it starts slipping, they could save splitting the tractor, because most problems are due to low flow or pressure of oil to the TA unit.

Anyway, on to the test:

Start the tractor, drive it around to warm up the oil.   It doesn't have to be all the way hot, but you want it at least somewhat close to operating temperature.   When driving it, have it in the direct position (forward) and turn the steering all the way to lock, and keep pressure against the lock, and press on the brake at the same time.  Don't jam it, just enough pressure to activate it.   If the TA downshifts (with the handle forward), like you pulled back on the handle, now (handle still forward) release the brake, and straighten out the steering a bit.   If it shifts back 'up', your biggest problem is with the flow/pressure to the TA.   Often the 'priority valve' in the big valve block on the side of the transmission sticks, and lets oil by-pass, which causes low flow/pressure to the TA, making it slip, even if it isn't worn out.   It is easy enough to do a pressure test without drillingholes in anything, but you may need to put a tee in a line or two.

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Contributor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

Thanks for the input. If we can get a warmer day we will see what we can figure out. Not used to this cool weather at this time of year.

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Contributor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

We did the test and the Ta did shift down. We checked the pressure from the hydraulic outlets(they have not been a problem as far as we can tell) and seem fine. Where else  do we test for pressure and what would indicate a problem  and how do you test the bypass valve. It may be just an illusion but it seems to be a bit better in cold weather-thicker oil? Thanks for your help!

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Senior Advisor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

Check the free travel on your clutch pedal.

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Senior Contributor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

Chances are, your problems with the oil flow/pressure are in the MCV valve.   This is the big machined valve block on the left side of the transmission housing, below the clutch pedal.   It is the square metal block, that appears to be bolted on with a large number of bolts.   A small linkage rod will come off the main clutch linkage, to a valve on a rocker, on the back side of the valve.  It is (if I remember right) a little over an inch thick, and will have an oil pressure sensor screwed in towards the top of it, that will lead to the transmission pressure warning light in the dash.  Where this sensor threads in, is the first place you would check pressure.  

On the 66/86 series tractors, the hydraulic system is in 2 parts, with one part going to the remote outlets & 3-point, and the other part operates the TA, the brakes, and the hydraulic clutch booster.  They are separate from each other, with each being fed from a separate stage of the hydraulic pump.

The fact that the TA shifted down when the steering hit the end, and bled some oil out the relief,  means that you are lacking pressure/flow on that circuit somewhere.    Attatched is a link to someone describing how to do a pressure test.  Read the pressure at idle or just above idle, and again at about 1800 RPM.   Also, have someone watch the guage, and cycle the steering from lock to lock, while applying the brakes, and when doing both at the same time.   If there is a notable drop in pressure, note when it happens (my guess will be when the steering hits lock one way or the other).  
Low pressure all the time could be a bad pump, blown seal somewhere (even within the TA itself) or cracked line.   Fluctuating pressure, or pressure that drops notably when the steering hits lock is likely a stuck or worn out priority valve, or relief valve.

Also, there is a linkage, off the clutch main linkage, that goes to a little valve on a rocker arm in the MCV itself.  Be sure that when the clutch is released (foot off pedal) that the linkage is not binding, and the valve retracts fully into the MCV body.   If that valve is sticking, it can cause oil to by-pass.

They now make 'lifetime' TA units, for not all that much extra money, or if on a budget, you can install a TA eliminator, and never worry about it again.

 

Here is the link for the pressure check - Good luck!

 

http://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=72256

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Senior Contributor

Re: international 1086 TA / clutch help?

In my experience a slipping clutch will also work better in colder conditions, The hotter they get the worse they slip.  Patrick

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