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marketeye
Veteran Advisor

A 4-H summer

So far, it's been a 4-H summer.

 

High heat: Midwest crops are gearing up for the hottest temperatures of the summer, starting tomorrow.

 

High water: A southwest Iowa/northwest Missouri farmer says the crops that are not in water look good. But, the sad part of it is there are thousands of acres of lost crops along the Missouri River.

 

High wind: Some Iowa farmers are facing yield losses from recent 80-110 mile per hour winds. One Linn County, Iowa farmer, with wind-damaged corn, says before the winds their crops were headed for record yields. And, some neighbors have it even worse.

 

High prices: After taking nearly $2 off the corn market, following the June 30 USDA Acreage Report, the corn and wheat markets have stormed back. China and high heat threats have pulled the farm markets out of the ditch. Some basis levels, around the country, (especially at ethanol plants) are very strong.

 

Which of these H's have you experienced or are still experiencing? How long do you see these H's in play? I thought of including this H on the list:  cHina. But then the play on the 4-H program goes away.

 

Mike

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2 Replies
Blacksandfarmer
Esteemed Advisor

Re: A 4-H summer

How long until the next rain.

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marketeye
Veteran Advisor

Re: A 4-H summer

Well depending upon where you live, it looks like rain will be scarce for at least 5 days. As I type this note, I'm watching a guy 'drag' a baseball field and he is kicking up quite a bit of dust. So, that tells me the ground around Chicago could be needing a drink. Anybody out there farm within one hour of Chicago either direction? What's the topsoil moisture like on your farm?

 

Wxrisk.com offers this report Friday morning. It essentially says yeah there is a cold front north of the U.S., but when and if it drops down is the question. The weather website commentary says, "The main issue in the forecast this morning is the arrival of the cold front that drives into the upper Plains and eventually into the Midwest July 21-22-23. The timing is going to depend on the development of a significant LOW over southwest Canada JULY 21-22... which then moves into Manitoba and then into Western Ontario. The GFS models is stronger with this Low so its cold is stronger and the front moves in faster . The European model is weaker with this southwest and south central Canada Low so the cold front is weaker and it takes longer to get into the Midwest.
 
We are still too far away from the event -- the arrival of this cold front-- to know the timing for certain but what we do know is that the heat wave will be over with by July 24-25," according to the Wxrisk.com report.

 


 

Mike

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