cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Any one else use a spreadsheet.

I have a excel spreadsheet with remaining crop inventories and potential crop production figures. I plug in the values each crop for each day and it gives me a numeric value at the close each day.

 

Instead of a per bushel value I can see overall crop values which can be helpful in marketing decisions. I know I do it wrong but I base my sales somewhat on the math.

 

It might help some others more than all the hype that is available.

0 Kudos
14 Replies
Canuck_2
Senior Contributor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

Yes, I use one.

Starts with my five year average yield (from another spread sheet) listed.

As I make sales it calculates tonnes left and % sold.

 

It also calculates total the total $ for sale and gross.

Once actual yield is known and input it switches to calculating actual with remaining tonnes to sell.

It also calculates an average price per tonne for the years sales.

 

I do have another section that calculates value of grain left if i input todays price.

I use it January first for inventory valuation and occassionly other times of the year but not on a regular basis.

I use it for following my sales rather than figuring when to sell although sometimes seeing all the $$ in the bin yet will encourage me to let grain go and turn into $$.

 

Been using spreadsheets for many things for probably 30 years now.

Cash flows.

Budgets

Etc.

Built one to log and calculate race times for cross country skiers one time.

Great tool!

0 Kudos
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

Yes k,
Lots of em. The only way I can keep some things, like marketing, in perspective. Compared to other production factors that affect the financial stmt.
0 Kudos
kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

I don't use them to the extent that I used to because i really don't have that many decisions to make. Cropping is 50/50 corn soybean rotation year after year even though I sure ConC would pay more some years. For one thing it makes it easier for the custom farmer.

 

I do use them for real estate purchases and print of amortization schedules and compare different amounts borrowed, interest rates and loan period. It is really helpful to analyze the various options.

 

The crop inventory speadsheet is really helpful as to can see what your exposure is as to down side risk. Over the years i think I have focused too much on dollars per bushel when dollars per acre is probably more important.

 

I thought maybe the younger inexperienced chaps could find it helpful.

0 Kudos
4wd
Senior Contributor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

No

If you cannot push a pencil and operate a little hand held calculator, how will a fancy dandy excell spread sheet and IBM mega-byte computer help you figure profits and losses. Besides you need to keep a lot of it in your head anyway.

0 Kudos
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

I am just starting to use the inventory spreads.  We have some on farm storage now forcing me to do it and I can see that I should have been doing it all along because we deliver grain to more than one location and there is crop share bushels to be tracked.

I used to do it on a field spreadsheet, just detailing load tickets at the bottom, but the ss was for input details per field.

I use ss for, crop choice comparisons, field history data & costs, water history and cost,  fertilizer test and application history,  herbicide & insecticide history, grain yield, storage inventory, and cash flow planning.

I should have taken time years ago to take an excel class.  It would have been a better investment than any commercial program I have found. 

0 Kudos
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

I love historical data.  One of the best things a young farmer can do is detail it in a comparable, useable format.  I remember what I want to remember (or forget).  It always suprises me how much the recorded data teaches me.  

Sometimes I remember the sales pitches and popular ideas better than my own historical data.

We all face different cost factors and one new idea can change the net results in multiple ways.  

The whole process trains you to analyze decisions better.

0 Kudos
kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

The advantage of spread sheets is that you can enter variable inputs and get an almost instantanious report how the changes effect outcome. You can enter many options and get alot of quick answers.

 

Most of us that run speadsheets are quite capable of running a pencil and a calculator. In fact, I used to be quite capable of doing many calculations in my head but Obviously I have slipped some from days past.

 

My grandaughter that is 21 is the only one of my kids that inherited that ability and it is pretty amazing.

0 Kudos
kraft-t
Senior Advisor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

Historical data spurred my interest. I went back and pulled up a couple of old spread sheets.

 

 

 In 2007  I bought a farm and i calculated  the CSR rating by using a soil map and the amounts of 20 different soil types. Most just variations of the same soil types It figured out to 81.6 CSR on the 90 acre field. That was used to establish the value of the land compared to recent sales at that time.

 

I still have that spread sheet saved to the hard drive and was able to pull it up.

 

Another example is the list of all the corn loads that came off one specific field in 2002. The bushels and the moisture content, I don't really need that info any more but it is there if I want to look it up. Some should be deleted but It's really handy to have some of that stuff available.

0 Kudos
4wd
Senior Contributor

Re: Any one else use a spreadsheet.

I'm afraid you have lost it Kraft-t.

 

You don't need the accuracy that a spread sheet provides unless you are doing your taxes or providing info for an audit or bank loan.

What you need is on the spot thinking. For instance when looking for a tractor you want, you need to know about what it is generally worth before making an offer, then expecting to be worked up from there to your limit, but, not let that limit be only one bid from owning it either. Also, sizing up the situation and seeing what fits the needs of both the buyer and seller. There is more intuition involved in making purchases or sales than those hard fast figures a spread sheet provides. You need to have it in your head, otherwise you will pay too much, or sell too cheap, or worse completely miss out. The only way to get that in your head is from experience and study of what others are paying and selling for. If you have to figure hard with spread sheets before acting, you lose. Learn to think on your feet. Make informed desisions from info beyond the numbers.

Chances are that land you bought in '07 was way overpriced, and you paid more than anyone else, but for some reason you took action and made the decision to buy. Did the spread sheet put you over on your purchase decision, or was the gut involved? Are you glad today you did it?

0 Kudos