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Honored Advisor
Posts: 8,138
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
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Re: Brazil Update

yes ---------- I should have clarified.  I was thinking more of the Working cap and land loans.

 

Thanks for the correction..  roarintiger1

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Registered: ‎11-09-2010
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Re: Brazil Update

[ Edited ]

Pleeeeese . . . call 911 I have fallen and cannot get up, I am laughing so hard.  Those Brazilian drivers and those ports described will be ran about as effecient as a the cars  at a Mexican funeral without jumper cables.  You know there are only two main ports for exporting Grain in Brazil (and you named one of them). 2000 trucks a day if they were are all 42 ft. grain trailers (and they are not) would be dellivering 1,800,000 bushels a day if running like a well oild machine. 22 million tons is approximately 792,000,000 bushels which means it will only take 440 days to ship that amount out of the country.

 

lets see . . . when all is exported they will be finished about the end of March 2014.  If they have the same luck with shipping 2000 truckloads a day from the other terminal, and it is also running like a well oiled machine, it will only take 220 days to ship the crop or it should be all shipped in about seven months. when beans are being harvested here in teh US..  But what about the record sugar crop that they do not want to talk about?  

 

Sorry, I find humor in this situation, but most of the truckers in Brazil are illiterate, it has no real infrastructure, each state is a seperate country in and to itself, and the most powerful man in each state is the governor, the Federal Government announcements mean nothing, if the governors do not approve it.   Like the Mexicans, Brazilians  live in fantasyland located in the land of Oz and NOTHING has urgency.  Wonder if in that Catholic country they will be working on Saturday or Sunday.  Just sayin . . . .   adios amigos. John

Honored Advisor
Posts: 8,138
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
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Re: Brazil Update

Faust I just read the fcStone guess at Brazil soy production------ the number was 83 million tons.  I know my tonage conversion isn't exactly right, but in our tons there are @ 33 bu/ton.  That puts the crop at 2.739 Billion bushels.  If they can only store 20% of the crop---- that leaves 2.191 Billion to the port or 1217 days at 2000 loads per day per port.  If there are two ports unloading 2000 trucks per day then it will take 608.5 days to export this years soy crop.  

 

Point is the story is incomplete or Brazil is developed better than google says.  What distorts the data?????? Surely they have more storage than 

 

 

 

Honored Advisor
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Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: Brazil Update

Roads               and Access

There are thousands of kilometers of paved roads               in the cerrado frontier, but there is need for tens of thousands               more. The cerrados are so vast and the distances so great that it               will take years for road construction and improvements to meet needs.               In the meantime, most cerrado land will be accessed via unpaved               roads.

              The condition of unpaved roads in Western Bahia range from fair               to good.  While unpaved roads are passable throughout the year,               the rainy season brings out 4WD vehicles. With 1,100 to 1,800 mm               of rain falling over a six-month rainy season, maintenance of dirt               roads is a challenge.

              Dryland farming is relatively unaffected by poor roads. Planting               occurs at the beginning of the rainy season when roads are in fairly               good condition. Harvest starts at the beginning of the dry season               when roads can be better maintained.

              Irrigated agriculture cycles are not tied to the rainy and dry seasons.               Crops may be harvested in the rainy season when road conditions               are poor. Poor road conditions slow transport of the harvest but               rarely stop it. Some of the most successful irrigated farms in Western               Bahia are located more than 60 km from paved roads.

              Poor roads slow the transport of inputs and crops, but poor roads               have not retarded the continued advance of profitable cerrado agriculture.

Honored Advisor
Posts: 8,138
Registered: ‎07-18-2011
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Re: Brazil Update

Sorry I lost it mid sentence.  Thanks hobby  --------

 

There has been many years of production and much foreign investment-------- And with those ever increasing volumes----- I guess I just expected more development from the country that is going to feed the world in the future.

Honored Advisor
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Registered: ‎01-10-2012
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Re: Brazil Update

 

Lucas do Rio Verde is located  220 miles north of Cuiabá, the state capital of Mato Grosso and is one of Mato Grosso's major agricultural cities.  Lucas has a population of 28,000 and has been growing at 18% per year over the past five years.  Lucas has a strong German and Italian family lineage to southern Brazil.  Its inhabitants look like that of any small farm town in the Central USA.   As one eats pizza on a Saturday night in one of the many restaurants that surround the central city park, one cannot help but notice the tall, blonde blue eyed citizens of this very dynamic farm community. The symbol of the city is that of an EMU.  The locals will tell you with great pride how it represents the pride of one's head held high and its long legs symbolizing the fast forward progress of the development of the region.  The EMU will run ahead of the rest.

 

The County of Lucas do Rio Verde planted 313,000 acres of soybeans in 1995.  By 2003, the expansion of planted area totaled 533,000 acres. The population of the city has doubled the past 10 years. The city has a new hospital, five new schools, a university, soccer field, five public swimming pools, and many other public areas for recreation. The city is safe and the houses do not have a  protective wall or fence around them. Children walk home from school without any concerns of crime. It is truly a mirror of small town America.

 

The Region receives between 80-90 inches of rainfall in an 8 month period starting in September and ending in April. The 1st crop planted is generally Soybeans, then a 2nd crop of Corn or Cotton is No-tilled in directly behind the combines. During the January time frame one can literally see combines and planters working in the same field together.  For those that have invested in irrigation systems, a 3rd crop is also planted. This crop is typically edible beans.

 

This county does not have any land left to be cleared. 80% of the county is in production and 20% is left in reserve (natural forest). 600 feet along all waterways also must be left in its natural habitat. The county is rapidly developing vertically integrated Hog and Chicken Cooperatives.  Lucas is becoming a HUB of business activity for the southern part of the frontier.

 

Pioneers continue to push father east and west from BR 163 in their quest for  cheaper land to clear.

The city of Lucas is now served by one commercial air carrier Monday through Friday with connections to Cuiabá and Sinop.