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Senior Advisor

Corn Yield Determinants

The time when corn yield is determined is starting.  We have a ways to go before we'll have a better idea of what the yield will be.

 

This Illinois paper gives some interesting observations to date.  One thing it talks aobut is planting time and how that affects yield.  From the looks of things, the planting dates this year favor above trned line yields, but not conclusively summer weather is a bigger factor, they say.

 

It's a short paper and rather intresting.  We have a long way to go and only a few of the factors are already in play.  The ones that are are supportive.  Now, I wish they'd talk about my moisture level here, but that is probably not critical for another couple of weeks.

 

http://www.farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/2012/05/the_season_for_determining_cor.html 

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2 Replies
Honored Advisor

Re: Corn Yield Determinants

FWIW,  Many of us here is NW Ohio planted our corn last year from June 1-6  and ended up averaging over 200 bushels per acre. We had almost perfect weather for the rest of the summer.  While we will probably never see that again, we are proof that a late planted crop can do very well if the weather is good after the planting date.  Without good summer weather now, this early planted date stuff doesn't mean squat.  The overall weather picture for the next three months will determine our yields.

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Corn Yield Determinants

It all depends on summer temperatures

 

10 times since 1970, the major corn growing areas of the Nation had summer (June 1 to August 31) temperatures of 1.0 degrees F or more below normal. We set a new national corn yield record in eight of those years (and one of the years we did not was the big flood year of 1993). 2009 was the last summer with temperatures that cool (and we scored record national yields)

 

11 times since 1970, the major corn growing areas of the Nation had summer (June 1 to August 31) temperatures of 1.0 degrees F or more above normal. Only once in those years did we set a new national corn yield record (1987) and yields were below the long-term linear trend in nine of the 11 years. Our last two summers had temperatures more than 1.0 degrees F above normal (and we scored below trend national yields on both years).

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