cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Senior Advisor

Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

I did alittle research this morning -pulling info from my corn and soybean field guide from Purdue .

 

With all the delayed planting -- there has been a lot of doom on here , I can relate to last year - not to wet but dry - so not trying to sugar coat anything .

 

But heres some info you might find interesting on corn .

 

Quoted from the field guild : As planting is delayed beyond about May 1 .the number of necessary GDD's from planting to silking de reases about 1.6 Gdd's per day of delayed planting . The number of necessary From planting to kernal black layer decreases by 6.8 GDD's per day of planting delay . These data show that adapted full season maturities can be planted much laterthan previously thoght and still safely mature prior to the average ate of a killing fall freeze .

 

For example, if a hybrid norrmally requires 2,800 GDD's from planting to maturity , then it will require slightlly less then 2,600 GDD's if planted on May 31 rather than then May 1 . End of Quote .

 

 

 

 

And now to beans - this is a copy and paste from UMN for you northern guys and gals . I know this chart only go's to Jume 14 - But do's give some kind of idea on yields or lack of . If the yield drops at the same rate then , June 20 would be down to 65 % - i would think at some point it might level off some then drop hard .

 

 

So is there Hope ?  Or just Doom ?

 

Best Of Luck

 

 Ken

 

 

Planting date and soybean yield

Since early-May plantings usually result in maximum yields, lower yields should be expected for later plantings (see Table 2). Planting soybeans in Minnesota on May 10 results in only a 2-percent yield loss; on May 15 in a 3-percent yield loss, and on May 20 in a 6-percent yield loss (or 94 percent of normal yield).

Table 2
Planting date Yield loss (%) Yield potential (%)
May 1 0 100
May 5 1 99
May 10 2 98
May 15 3 97
May 20 6 94
May 25 9 91
May 30 13 87
June 4 18 82
June 9 24 76
June 14 30 70
0 Kudos
17 Replies
Highlighted
Advisor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

what happens when you plant on june 20 and then you get over 6 inches of rain on them and then you havent had any sunshine on themfor 10 days (probably good after 6 inches of rain and i haven't looked at what we got last nite). we have had mass casualties of ducks and geese here due to drowning

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Veteran Advisor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

I am full of hope.

 

I hope that the fall market goes up enough so that my 85% guarantee on my cadillac crop insurance pays me well for my guaranteed bushels.

 

Soybeans look pathetic.

 

Corn has a chance to make an average yield.

 

The world is going to need a good crop from South America next year, and all the DDG's we can muster out of this corn crop, once it runs through the ethanol plants.

Highlighted
Honored Advisor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

Ecin
A significant number of beans planted 25 of June where is that chart?
Did I mention a couple of days ago we could use rsin shortly?
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Senior Advisor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

Glad to here that Red -- The hope part - I ' always try - ( try ) to stay that way till the fat lady sings anyway !

 

And Brother Hoosier -- as my good friend DB-51 would say -- your screwed !    Just kidding with yeah . I as watching the Radar last night and was wondering if that BIG rain near the queen city got ya . 

 

We have had 2.4 in the last week - most are from 2 tenths to 7 tenths rains  - could use alittle sunshine up here , see if you could work on that , lol .

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

University of Minnesota  at Waseca and Lamberton research shows planting soybeans on June 24 , you incur a 43 % yield loss. It doesn't show any for July 4 planting.  Iowa State University shows that you can expect to get only 33% of nornal yield for beans planted in early July in Northern Iowa.  Some are using coop floaters  to spread the beans, then dig them in. Still very wet in those fields.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Senior Advisor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

Slim - we ran into the same deal 25 years ago or so , we used floaters - and then disked them in - Crop insurance would not cover them - they said it was not a good farming practice . I did it anyway - beans ended up doing better than the insurance would pay , guess I was jus lucky

0 Kudos
Highlighted

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

I'm more concerned about the lack of sun in the ECB although that becomes a much bigger factor later on.

 

We might actually be dry by them, you never know.  Can remember many wet early seasons here where that turned out to be the case.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Honored Advisor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

The days are getting shorter.............Thought I'd make that statement........just in case the boys in Chicago hadn't noticed.

0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Doom and Gloom OR Hope ?

Most everyone on this board is an active farmer and I can’t give many knowledgeable comments so I mostly read what others say.  I own a quarter section of inherited southwest Minnesota land but live 600+ miles away in Indiana and I’ve had it custom farmed in the past 7-8 years. I’ve had several different operators in the 20+ years of having it farmed.

I do keep planting and yield records. Therefore, in this matter of yield loss in later planting I make note of the following data.

 

Planting Date                         Yield

May 31, 2005                         48.62 BPA

May 17, 2006                         44.12 BPA

May 19, 2008                         41.94 BPA

May 11, 2009                         40 NPA

May 25, 2011                          46.66 BPA

June 3, 2013                          ???

          As you can see, the two best yielding years for beans were the two later planted crops, 2005, and 2011, and the best yield of all was the latest planted date, May 31, 2005. Obviously there’s  a lot of factors influencing yield and planting dates are only one factor but it will be interesting to note what happens this year.  Originally the operator thought he’d be able to get the crop in by the middle of May, but the rain took over before that could be done.

                   At the moment  I don’t have the calculations for corn planting and yield.   

Slim5819

 

0 Kudos