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Frequent Contributor

First there was Mad Cow Disease...now Mad Soybean Disease???

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3 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: First there was Mad Cow Disease...now Mad Soybean Disease???

We'll have to get some better projections of how it affects yield to know how it will affect the markets.

 

I wonder if farmers named this disease?  We have Mad Cow which is based on seeing a dairy cow staggering around and uses the British use of the word mad as crazy or deranged and we have Swine Flu which has nothing to do with hogs.  Are we going to keep on wounding ourselves in marketing and the public perception by the way we name or permit others to name diseases?  There was some pushback on swine flu and I'd like to see someone come up with a name we insist on for this disease other than "mad" anything.

 

Here's a story calling it crazy soybean.

http://www.soybeansandcorn.com/news/Jul19_10-Soja-Lucas-2-or-Crazy-Soybean-2-Puzzles-Brazilian-Scien...

 

USDA has this to say about it:

 

Untreatable “Mad Soy Disease 2” and resistant Asian Rust strains worry the sector “Soja Louca 2” or “Mad Soy Disease 2” is an anomaly manifested through an endless vegetative cycle or retarded maturity of the soybean plant known to reduce yields by over 40 percent. In past years, the anomaly affected soybeans in hot northern growing regions on a sporadic basis, but is now extending to more Southern temperate growing regions with increased prevalence overall. The anomaly affects non-genetically engineered and genetically engineered soybeans the latter representing an estimated 78 percent of planted area in 2010/11. Brazilian plant scientists have yet to identify the cause of this current anomaly; however, a very similar anomaly years before proved to be caused by an insect and is now under control. A current hypothesis is that a certain mite may be the cause of Soja Louca 2; however, there are no known effective treatments. The increased prevalence in Mato Grosso, a key producing state, among other states has brought this issue to the forefront. Producer groups are requesting Brazilian Government Agencies act more quickly to approve the commercial release of more effective fungicides to combat evolving Asian rust strains that first appeared in 2001/2002. State authorities are enforcing the vazio sanitario – a 60- or 90-day period in which planting is prohibited to control soybean rust. Soybean rust appears well managed in Brazil, but multiple fungicide applications erode profitability. One official rust detection has already been confirmed this season.

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Senior Contributor

Re: First there was Mad Cow Disease...now Mad Soybean Disease???

I will guess that eventually Brazil will find itself in a position of lengthening its rotations and moving away from such intensive soy production. Opening new land can minimize some of the resistence and disease pressures, but it isn't a sustainable strategy. My area (cold soils) was once a two year rotation area. It is now majority 3 year rotation.

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Senior Contributor

Re: First there was Mad Cow Disease...now Mad Soybean Disease???

kory melby says its nothing but hypeI see Bloomberg has a crazy soybean II article today. Dont worry about it. Hype. http://fb.me/LSfcjxIE 

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