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Wind
Advisor

Re: Floor Talk February 18, 2021

So milo might chase a few corn acres.  I would suppose dry land soybeans would burn-up in Aug. too.  Nice you Kansas folks have good options this year.  I sure hope China keeps buying your milo.  They are stop and go sometimes.  Thanks for the info on the wheat.  Years ago there was a farmer here that grew some Winter wheat but the wet June and July months were hard on it.  He soon went back to corn and beans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fx9fMG5VTsI

Get your check book out.  Hatcher land auction

 

clayton58
Veteran Advisor

Re: Floor Talk February 18, 2021

You’re right about dry land beans. August is definitely not friendly to them. Although we can grow pretty good beans under a sprinkler. I’m interested in seeing results from the sale today. Seems to have put Sw Kansas on the map 

0 Kudos
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Floor Talk February 18, 2021

I'm fully behind what Clayton says....... Wind touched on the issue when it comes to acres in our part of the fringe.

Alternatives....... those who plant for max yield (we love corn). may maintain those acres because of commitments to feeding or dairy (or they have great water and great land)..... corn is just easy in large acreages if the ducks line up.

But most of the fringe this way, does not have organized ducks.  dry land , marginal water  etc..

And there are those (who are in growing numbers) who plant for maximum profit.  Now with milo a full dollar above corn in the area and wheat awaking like an ancient volcano rumble.(small tremors)----price wise.  We may actually save enough wheat in '21 to plant the area.   

And water availability continues to decline..... 

These factors will probably continue to push corn acres down from their peak in the 1960s......in this fringe....area.

Hopefully that will increase our basis advantage on corn that does get planted..... and that will be somewhere lower than last years acres.

Great comment on spring wheat.  Always looks like a mistake compared to winter wheat...... Our choice for several years ag0, when usda limited wheat and allowed alternatives,  was barley, which yielded well but was always cheaper than anything else...... with milo and wheat looking profitable and working well with cattle .......... well milo will keep spring wheat out of the mind.

Sorry Clayton -- you pretty well had that covered

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clayton58
Veteran Advisor

Re: Floor Talk February 18, 2021

sw, Not a problem.  Thanks for the affirmation.  Feel free to repeat or refute what I post whenever it is needed or appropriate.  And BTW,  I hope the voice from the feedyard is still around.  We need more horse sense, cattle sense, common sense, or whatever you want to call it.

sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Floor Talk February 18, 2021

Im rethinking it.... Feedyard Talk....... I have some better connections in yard management that might be helpful.

Sometimes my sentimental family style entertainment is maybe out of place. When I think that is what we need.  Publishing management is so sold out to political pressure that sensitivity to opinion is high pitch all the time.  Including social media of all types----- maybe they are so narrowly integrated that ...... "there is only one store in town and nobody wants to tick off the owner or manager."   But I think we all need to find the things we connect too and family and neighborliness instead of buying into the stereotypes promoted by politicians and publishing.  Just maybe the east coast arrogant lamebrains are not as condescending as we think they are ....and us folks in the midwest are not  the deplorable fools we are projected to be....  I think we all need to remember how much we depend on each other..... or at least should (depend on each other).   The divide and conquer politics of hate and envy of the east should be the concern of publishing rather than the the credentials we live by.  I kind of feel like Mikes point of we "need  that" might  have been followed by "just not from readers who have no credentials".  When in fact I have never been asked for mine, the assumption seems clear "who in their right mind would give thought to words on a free platform"....... but I think at least for me. there is some loneliness in agriculture.  Many of us who have hung on since the 50's and survived have done so by attaining some serious skills.  but have lost neighborhood, church, and social family I live in a faith based community that is gone.... like the artesian valley east of us when my dad once refereed basketball for a rural church school...... My community is now descendants who live in Texas Missouri Arizona Colorado cities and ask about home when they get their harvest report every year and ask Hows grandpa's farm?  How's the old community?  I look around and there isn't 3 farmsteads in 6 miles any direction that makes their living in agriculture currently and one of those is an employee of one of the others.... in the 50s that area had 25 farms and a grade school and 2 churches ..,................

Every community in western ks struggles with the same issues and we all need to be looking around in a much bigger circle for advice and friendship.  Ive lived a pretty good life and most of the survivors in farming have.  I know why the guy at liberal sold out yesterday, even though he had ownership of 10k acres,,,,, the constant grind and stress of managing production agriculture at those levels is not a lifestyle anybody wants....It is a full time grind and a near impossible life for a marriage if she did not see that level of commitment growing up.  Why on earth does he need to work hard in servitude to this society?   That is what I saw yesterday.  A husband and a wife that have decided to enjoy a few years together, they can afford it and are sick of the grind.   That should say something to the rest of us.  especially those in cities where they can't grow their own.

I reached that point more than 5 years ago,  I brought younger in and my sons came back from careers in publishing and education, thanks to their commitment I have relaxed a little, we are still surviving, and enjoy 4 little boys at the farm but I write Feedyard and often other comments very late at night.  I still haven't got comfortable with sleeping regularly.  I have always operated in a farm construction mindset, with my accounting education.  Hopefully my sons with very different degrees will live to enjoy the farm in a "less pressure" format than I did.  I never have loved farming.  I was just committed to help my dad.

The marketing advice I have gained from "marketing", has largely been from the readers.... the experts called on here are decades behind of what we do in the SW...... my life long best finance reference was a neighbor farmer who owned and sat on bank boards...... Stock advice was a quaker farmer we have farmed for(his family) since 1959 when he retired and gave up his 8 quarter farm that year( we bought his acres from his grandchildren in 2021).... He retired on the portfolio he had accumulated from farming and very savy investing.  He was the first "hobby farmer" I ever knew.  Managing investments was easy for him, but he loved farming.  My current friend with that title is a gifted engineering mind, but he won't want to talk about that. He loves farming and manages one of the most difficult farms I have ever seen.  

I miss the neighbors........ I'll  give ya the best advice I ever got...... "Success in agriculture is not based on knowing everything or working harder...... It is based on knowing who to call and who to listen to for advice."  I grew up friends with 3 very good lawyers, the best electrician, neighbors who believed in education, a church that spoke in the fewest words possible, and a family that expected integrity.....and prayed over everything.  And I never heard one man cuss the wind.  That means your tough in our area as you know.  I've always been lucky and wanted to be somebody best friend but they keep moving away.... so I am willing to sit on the tailgate with Rick till he proves to me he was born without ears.

the difficulty of writing more than the one word comments on this forum is most of the readers here have no risk in agriculture, even if they still own acres back home, the lease structures guarantee them profit every year without risk.  Marketing advisers fall into problematic categories,  those who don't care who their advising, and those who have a one answer fits all approach.  Both miss the point.  Advice must be molded to the individual farm, its opportunities, its financial position and its talents.  It just isn't very good in a usda based "one size fits all" platform.

IMO "all of the American society misses their rural roots."    I think folks will finally get sick of living in cities now that technology is here and they can buy google stock from the Gove county or Meade if you prefer.  But nobody ever thinks they will get mugged until they do.  

Can you imaging ups trucks delivering every meal to the midwest in a good winter storm?

Sorry I bent your ear so long.