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Senior Advisor

For the curious - this is the Palouse

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2460659/Stunning-photographs-mistaken-paintings-beauty-Palou...

 

The colors in the following are way too enhanced for my taste but it's all the style.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2151501/The-breathtaking-landscape-pictures-stunning-look-li...

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2344380/Rural-America-color-rainbow-Photographer-captures-br...

 

My location is a bit closer to the mountains with more Ponderosa Pines and some ravines and a curtain of mountains to my east. There are many vantage points (buttes) to overlook the scenes.

18 Replies
Veteran Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

it was created by the master painter, Palouser!

 

consider yourself a blessed man........beautiful indeed...........

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Veteran Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

Brings back some nice memories from a couple of years ago

 

We purchased a nice picture of the Palouse at a gallery in the area and have it on our living room wall

 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

Was it a pic of a dam ???  Smiley Wink  Well, it could have been I guess!

 

By the way, the guy that shot Palouse Falls in a kayak blew out his spine doing another similar stunt somewhere else.

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

Gorgeous photos, I wouldn't know what to do or how to act if things maintained that level of freshness our here.  Does it really stay that green all season long?

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

No, it does not stay that green. It turns tan and gold by August. The British newspaper commentator can't tell grass from young wheat, etc. The commentary is almost comical. They know what they know and they haven't been to the Palouse Smiley Wink

 

We get little rain after June and an annual total of 20+". We don't green up after harvest. Short growing season. End of June is all shades of green from lime to dark green. We barely saw a wisp of green this year of emerging WW before we started freezing up. We're in snow and mud season now. We are NOT the coast!

 

You can see a lot of Palouse farming by Googling. Try 'Palouse farming images' , Palouse harvest images', 'Palouse hills images'.

 

-1.jpgHere's a pic from harvest.

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

No kidding, only 20" annual precip?  Hell, that is as bad as Kansas in most years.

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

A good year would be 25" and less than ideal might be 20" but we don't have a lot of variation. Never been a complete wheat crop failure. Closest was '77 and we got 37 bu/ac. Spring crops were pretty banged up though. We were closer to 20" this year and averaged 95-99 bu ac.

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

What is your growing season and average summertime temperatures?  Obviously something is different than Kansas, probably the evaporation rate.

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Senior Advisor

Re: For the curious - this is the Palouse

Fine loess soil blown in with a lot of clay content. At 2600' we drop 40-50 degrees at night during the summer hot spells (why we can't grow corn). Maybe only 90 days between last and first frost. There are some summers we might not hit 100*.I have AC but don't use it with my well insulated house. Just open up at night and let the down hill flow of cool air chill the house, close up in the morning and it's good until the next evening.

 

Cool soils until sometimes July. But humidity can be 15% or slightly less during hot spells (for here). Our comfort index is seldom above the temperature in the summer and can be lower by up to 5 degrees. Most of our moisture comes in the late fall, winter and spring - though that pattern is changing to drier winters and wetter and longer springs. Winter is just mud and snow.

 

Moisture that goes in this soil stays until a plant pulls it out - even if it's a year later. Much of the Palouse at lower elevations is summer fallow with maybe 5-12 inches annual percip. But there aren't crop failures. It's dependable. My elevation is all annual cropping and mostly 3 year rotation - ww/sw or barley/ and a legume like lentils, field peas or garbs. Our winter wheat issues are root fungal diseases in cold soil and recropping makes the issue serious. 60 bu spring wheat is not considered a 'good' crop here, just OK. 40 is almost a disaster if it's soft wheat. We have  a hard time making protein on hard wheats.

 

Woe to him who looks at his neighbor's crop too long because there are no straight stretches. If you want to see something twice you have to back up. A stray moose, elk or deer can ruin your day. Delivery to a terminal is easy. Hire a professional who isn't afraid of a 2000' drop to the river in 6 miles and hopefully checks his brakes faithfully. Jakes and oil bath retarders were invented for this country - as were leveling combines.

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