cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Senior Contributor

GMO wheat gene escape

Do you guys that read this really believe this story about GMO wheat???   What I heard was this farmer was spraying a fallow wheat field and noticed wheat that didn't die from a spray application??   So he called Monsanto??  (Did he call Monsanto???) and they tested the wheat for a gene that has suppose to have been in locked down for 10 years or more???  They had GMO wheat years ago but didn't release because they where afraid of it crossing with wild grasses.   Maybe its just smoke in my glasses but does this make any sense to you?  Maybe its just around here, but if something doesn't die, , we get the disc out.   And how the heck would GMO wheat seed just now reach the seed industry. 


This is what I see,I'm assuming a lot on these

1) it could be natural selection that this farmer has just developed his own roundup ready wheat from over application of glyphosate,

2) its possible that there was seed wheat years ago that did escape into the system and this guy has been planting his own seed for the last 10 years.  Thus propagating this gene

3) where is this farmer, I'd like to talk to him, why can no one find the guys that have mad cows, or GMO wheat??  

4) This was a story that was placed in the market place to stop exports, allowing more wheat bushels on the domestic market and thus keeping the lid on corn prices.  

5) there are WAY to many unanswered variables on this deal.  If anyone knows anything else please post them here.  

0 Kudos
20 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

    I hav thought about everyone of your points,and wandred myself,if it boils down to keeping a lid on pricing.What a pitty if that were true.No better way to scew up production than screw the farmer out of his ability to assess market landscape,and terminate a possitive!

0 Kudos
Senior Advisor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

The suspect wheat samples were reported to Oregon State University where sophisticated testing was done that confirmed the wheat had the Monsanto RR 'event'. Which is illegal to release. Officials sat on this info for awhile but finally announced it. This triggered the policies of foreign nations including our biggest customers. No more to be said about consequences.

 

It doesn't matter what a farmer would do. It's about market integrity, representation and responsibility. Like StarLink and Liberty Link rice. There ARE consequences and it's what the customer thinks that is important. End of story. Except Monsanto is definitely in denial. They are suggesting only THEY can determine a GE event. And hinting at 'sabotage'. They are pi$$ing off a lot of agronomists at this point.

 

I realize that corn and bean farmers wouldn't think twice at this point - but I'm not a corn and bean farmer. I have specific markets to cater to.

 

Check it out.  http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2013/06/genetically_modified_wheat_res.html

0 Kudos
Senior Contributor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

I am a corn farmer and I believe wheat farmers have a very big problem.  Maybe all farmers at this point.  If the real cause of this is not found. It could and will happen again.  Maybe livestock or other grains will be affected in the future.  Maintaining exports is very important to all farmers. When the cause of this wheat problem is found, strong punishment will be needed.

0 Kudos
Veteran Advisor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

Montysan said it might be '' sabatoge''  --- and the dog ate my homework --- 

0 Kudos
Senior Contributor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

It's our tradition to wait until all the facts are in before passing judgement.   Given all the required security that accompanies research and development,   this could well be the act of a disgruntled employee or some anti-biotech activist.    It is wise to wait until the facts come out.   Otherwise,  we may have another Duke lacrosse team type rush to judgement where they were actually innocent.   George Zimmerman may well be judged to have legally used self defense,  but the news media and certain race hustlers have him guilty long before the trial starts.

 

I'm sure the Monsanto haters are enjoying themselves.   I don't necessarily have to love a company to appreciate products that have made corn borer a non-problem on my farm.   Hopefully,  farmers will be good stewards of biotech so it will remain an effective tool for years to come.

 

 

0 Kudos
Senior Contributor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

Thanks for the article Palouser,  and to all the others for their opinions,

 

But let me play devils advocate for a moment.  Colleges need money,  and if this came form Berkley I would say for sure it was a set up deal.   I don't like Monsanto, BUT maybe they didn't do anything wrong this time.  When I was in school when this was being tested years ago they where very, very picky about where they planted the test plots, if a person had an isoloated pivot somewhere they got BIG BIG bucks for letting Monsanto use it. 

 

I'm not saying anyone is at fault,,,or that there is anything crooked here but,  in my own opinion 1+1 doesn't equal two here.  

 

 

0 Kudos
Honored Advisor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

Yes ---------------- in the world of political activism  --------------------- This is a win/win all the way.

 

Great points--------- this whole thing has a bad smell to it.  And an easy scape goat.  

 

Why doesn't OSU answer the specific questions of history, location, cropping practices, planted or volunteer, etc, etc.  

They hold the keys to holding Monsanto accountable--------- if they should be.  They can identify the genome source but cannot identify the location of growth and condition of planting.

 

I also wait for some validity to this story.

But no matter how it comes out it was a big win for anti GMO forces.

 

Does it make you wish there was something acturally wrong with GMO?   It hybridization had faced this "climate"  would there have been countries baring import of grains produced from hybrid seeds?  

0 Kudos
Senior Advisor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

Hmmmm. You may be right about polarization regarding attitudes.

 

But, I'm not sure why OSU, rather than Monsanto, should be responsible for being the source of information and chain of custody, etc. Identifying the farmer, or the location of the field by the University doing testing isn't necessarily the responsible thing to do. Think about it.

 

It is the USDA investigating and no information is forthcoming. Until something indicating criminal behavior is suspected that would seem appropriate. However, there is apparently no question that this is Monsanto technology. But the market needs resolution quickly. The charge of 'sabotage' at this stage seems more speculative than any other explanation. How do you prove it is not 'sabotage'? You can't prove a negative. I'll hazard a guess that this will never be 'nailed down' but a plausible explanation from circumstantial evidence is probably likely.

 

Hybridization and GE aren't comparable, and it is a misunderstanding to think it is. Hybridization is a matter of traits within the same family of closely related organisms with known characteristics. GE can reach far afield and is not inherently safe, thus the need for testing and screening and isolation. The danger of escaping biological material that can reproduce is the very reason that responsibility for isolation and chain of custody in approved environments - and often follow up testing for verification - are essential. The owner of the material, without proof of criminal activity, is responsible for safekeeping. That would be Monsanto.

0 Kudos
Honored Advisor

Re: GMO wheat gene escape

Sounds simple but if responsibility is that easy to assign, I have some kochia weed I would like monsanto to accept responsibility for.  And there is that nasty shatter cane that is a leftover from the hybridization of grain sorghum many years back.

 

My only thought for OSU is their position of expertise and knowledge on the one hand and irresponsibility as to the verification of source of the material.

Their presence in the process provides credibility.  Credibility for a big discovery------------ or a nasty big hoax being saved for such an ocassion. ---------- or even industrial fraud from a competitor or an irritated employee.  They can't be in a position of ignorance or innocent if they are a tool in the process.

I would feel better about this if it had been under investigation for months by usda and we were discussing the findings of usda testing.

It appears to me that evidence is being presented publicly prior to the trial or the investigation ----------------- just smells a little.

 

Either way I am sorry our fellow farmers in the NW were hurt by something we will not get a good answer too. --------- it appears.

0 Kudos