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Senior Advisor

Grains inspected for export

Year to date - corn not quite double last year, soy ahead, and wheat up 25%.

 

 

 

               GRAINS INSPECTED AND/OR WEIGHED FOR EXPORT

 

                  REPORTED IN WEEK ENDING DEC 26, 2013

 

                            - 1,000 BUSHELS -

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

                                                   CURRENT     PREVIOUS 

 

             ----------- WEEK ENDING ----------  MARKET YEAR  MARKET YEAR

 

  GRAIN      12/26/2013  12/19/2013  12/27/2012    TO DATE     TO DATE  

 

 

 

BARLEY              0           1           0        3,581        5,575 

 

CORN           24,908      37,255       8,047      448,820      255,802 

 

FLAXSEED            0          39           0          233          429 

 

MIXED               0           0           0            0            0 

 

OATS               12          18           0          128          470 

 

RYE                 0           0           0            0            4 

 

SORGHUM         3,237         158         379       40,008       32,385 

 

SOYBEANS       43,182      55,280      35,925      865,576      779,941 

 

SUNFLOWER           0           0           0            0            0 

 

WHEAT          13,396      19,510       7,763      729,444      515,382 

 

Total          84,735     112,261      52,114    2,087,790    1,589,988 

 

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CROP MARKETING YEARS BEGIN JUNE 1 FOR WHEAT, RYE, OATS, BARLEY AND

 

FLAXSEED;  SEPTEMBER 1 FOR CORN, SORGHUM, SOYBEANS AND SUNFLOWER SEEDS.

 

INCLUDES WATERWAY SHIPMENTS TO CANADA.

 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Grains inspected for export

     Interesting chart,with barley and oats laging I suppose corn is becomming the better value.Sorgum being up,I wonder if that does'nt infact reflect on the demand for cheaper roughages that have obviously been very hot out of the grass seed production region of Ore. ie,Pal,what does that Palouse acreage go for should any ever come up for sale?

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Senior Contributor

Re: Grains inspected for export

 

Interesting,  where's all that Brazil corn that was supposed to be competiting with USA?

 

December 30, 2013

Source: NCGA

U.S. corn exports to Latin America continue to grow. According to the USDA, the Western Hemisphere's accumulated U.S. corn imports are more than 67 million bushels ahead of last year at this same time. Mexico, the second-largest U.S. corn market, is the largest contributor to this market change, importing 39.4 million bushels more than last year.

“It is exciting to see how free trade agreements lead to increased exports for farmers,” said National Corn Growers Association Trade Policy and Biotechnology Action Team Chair Jim Zimmerman. “The work done on a policy level is having a direct impact upon markets for corn. Right now, farmers clearly understand the importance of fostering all markets, particularly given the incredible abundance grown in 2013. Tearing down the barriers that allow our customers abroad access to our supply only makes sense for American agriculture and America’s economy.

” While Mexico dwarfs other importers, both Colombia and Peru show significant increases of U.S. corn imports. These two dramatic turnarounds can be attributed to free trade agreements that removed trade barriers and made U.S. corn a more attractive and competitively priced product.
 






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Senior Contributor

Re: Grains inspected for export

 The world S&D isn’t too bad for HRW  and though the US crop was under trend, there just isn’t much for the bull side.

Am I right, the SRW crop was record. What does that mean, fundamental bear market, price slips until the marginal demand is found. It may be spec demand.

 

Of course exports are running high, last year we didn’t have the corn, wheat, to export you can’t export air. The person here who keeps bringing up exports lacks knowledge of how global these markets are. N hemisphere filling in now while S hemisphere harvests and provides more market share from here on out.

 

Not to over play this, but with great conditions in the ECB why would we have a great 2013 SRW crop and why wouldn’t it be a bear?

 

There is no new paradigm  

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