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Senior Contributor

Re: Heres something to chew on

Just finished spraying 900 ac. of double crop beans this morning, have frogeye, anthraxnous, and insect feeding,  Will probably have to spray the last 100 ac. next week, checked some fields of early beans before it started raining today and found a tremendious amount of sudden death in them. We have had over 16 inches since august 1st. , we have corn rotting and sprouting in the shuck, going to start shelling next week to try to stop the losses, but raining hard here again and calling for a chance most of next week.If there is less corn acres harvested than some people think and if sb.losses keep increasing final numbers could be verry different. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Heres something to chew on

Nite,  that's a lot of DC beans, what was your first crop, wheat, and where are you located, KY?

We are fast closing in on 9" for the month, a lot of SDS here too. CIA.

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Senior Contributor

Re: Heres something to chew on

Yes, wheat was the first crop and we are about 30 miles south of Owensboro, Ky.That is about all the acres we can get the straw baled off of and get the beans planted on in 10 days without adding more equip. and labor.

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Senior Contributor

Re: I love it when

Hey Jen, I'm in Maryland, looked bad for a while this afternoon, but the Buckeyes pulled it off in the end. I mean looks like back to normal crops over here. In otherwords this part of the country will be "importing" again.
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Senior Contributor

Re: Heres something to chew on

I have never bragged on my marketing prowess and you know it. In fact if I were good at it I would be one of those know it all thousandaires.

 

To quote my deceased uncle, " you have to take the money when they want to give it to you!"  So if they are offering you an attractive bid you ought to consider it. If they are offering you far in excess of that you ought to seriously consider it. And if they are offering you far more than normal, maybe you ought to sell a few bushels.  

Veteran Advisor

Re: I love it when

Buckfarmer - at least Maryland won't be contributing to the large crop. It's that state's fault that we have the huge carry over we do from last year Smiley Wink

Jen
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Heres something to chew on

Okdon I totatlly agree with you about sales on high prices.  You also write in a way that is rational, and not trying to rub it in, like vr.

 

I think that the opposite also applies.  When prices are much lower than normal, try not to sell, unless you need cash.  That is were storage generally pays.

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Frequent Contributor

Re: I love it when

I love it when you make a complete donkey of yourself, with post like this.
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Advisor

Re: I love it when

Come on Jen, it wouldn't be so bad if you knew to be true. Are you still regurgitating the computer weather maps instead of making your own? Are you still hoping for a freeze and drought to finally sell corn. Oh well.
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Veteran Advisor

Re: I love it when

I don't get paid enough to draw my own maps, otherwise I would.  Besides, there's enough maps out there - it's the deciphering of the maps that are meaningful and the maps that are crap that I'm all in for.  Remember - that's how this all started last year.  This wasn't my choosing - it chose me.  I couldn't stand by any longer and let the talking heads on Saturday and Sunday TV say how much rain the corn belt was going to get, when it was obvious to me, it wasn't going to happen.

 

I may miss some the weather events, but I don't get paid for this, I don't have a degree, and I don't have a stake in what happens in the market place.  I call it as I see it, and since Hobby didn't ever send me those glasses, I see what I see.  No more, no less.  I call it good if I think it's good, and I call it crap if what I see is crap.

 

We have had another very strange year in my book weather wise.  I would love to spend more time studying what's going on in our environment, and with our star.  But that's not the direction that life has taken me.  In my work down here with the FAA students, I have the opportunity to change someone's life.  To give them the same opportunity at a good career that I was given.  And I don't take that responsibility lightly.

 

I had bins on my farm.  For me, my own advice from last harvest season is what I would be doing.....Harvest, Bin, Lock, and go on Vacation for the winter.  I would've probably had  a bit less than 50% sold, depending on whether or not I felt that I would've had a crop.  In Central WI, it was always a crap shoot.  I only sold one time what I didn't have, and it came back to burn me in a big way.  

 

I think most farmers on here probably are in the same boat that I described above.  Most have been through high prices, and most have been through low prices.  And most really don't care whether the price of corn goes lower or not.  As a matter of fact, I would say that most are saying, "Good."  Because they know, like I do, that the fix for low prices is low prices.  I don't think too many farmers are shaking in their boots over our current price situation.  This isn't 1980 with double digit interest rates.  Most are probably saying, what there is out there, there is.  They don't need to be reminded daily of how much they should've sold, or how great of a marketer someone is.  I've seen a lot of farmers make a lot of money, and they have had no marketing plan at all.  A plan, in a market structure that is no longer tied to supply and demand, no matter how well thought out and executed, is no guarantee of success.

 

Jen