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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Hobbyfarmer, just broadcast some tall season grasses

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Response to Childofthecorn,,

 

Years ago cattle guys here bragged about not having a government program or needing one.   When all these feed lots were built on cheap ccc grain........    tunnel vision.....

 

Most of the cattle farmers out here are in the same boat the grain guys were the last 4 years........ Don't have many to sell.   And the big prices don't help much

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ksenk
Visitor

Re: Just took one for the team

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Sorry about that MT, couple years ago we had 9 inches in 5 hours, not a pretty sight. Had to weave around in the country to get to a bar and the store.  Not much you can do for a while but drink and eat

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viperkev
Veteran Contributor

Re: Just took one for the team

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I completely agree! Better off too dry than a flood ANYDAY. We are very dry here but in May that can be a blessing in the long run. The old saying "a drought will scare you to death, but too wet will starve you to death" is a very true old adage here on these clay soils.

Kevin

Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: Just took one for the team

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MT' s area wasn't the only problem area...

 

80 TRAIN CARS DERAILED:

About 4 miles west of Osceola, about 80 train cars on a Burlington Northern Sante Fe train were blown over about 2 a.m. and several large trees were uprooted. Large branches on trees were snapped and several farm buildings lost their roofs. (view photos)

NWS officials said the wind in that area was estimated to average 60 to 70 mph, with higher embedded gusts of 70 mph to 80 mph.

FARM BUILDING BLOWN APART:

A farm near the train derailment near Osceola also saw heavy damage.

The Brammer farm is located 5 miles west of Osceola.  It lost a large shed that houses large farm equipment -- the roof and sides were blown apart.  The two families who live on the farm said no one was hurt.

They heard the storm hit around 2 a.m. that woke them up. The storm also took out trees. The derailed train cars are 50 feet from their farm.

CONFIRMED TORNADO: 

A tornado was confirmed near Ogden, about 1 mile west of town, about 3:52 a.m. by the emergency manager. It caused tree damage in the city and blocked at least one road.

In Truro, grain bins were damaged, as well as trees. Madison County law enforcement reported tree damage in St. Charles about 2:35 a.m.

A car was "moved into a field" by the storm, which also caused damage to a barn and home northwest of the Madison County town of Patterson about 2:50 a.m.

Farm buildings have been reported damaged or destroyed on Highway 34 near Murray. Winds were powerful enough to drive some branches into the ground, a storm spotter reported to the NWS.

A wooden barn was completely destroyed along 180th Avenue about 4 miles east of Murray about 2:15 a.m.

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Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: Just took one for the team

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It is very obvious to me most on here have NO CLUE what real drought is. 

 

Most are pure prima donnas on this subject. As a used to be diversified farmer I'll take wet over dry any day.

 

At least the cattle can eat.

 

Absolutely clueless about what 8 to 10 inches of moisture a year will do when metered out a 1/4. 1/2 an inch at a time over four years. No crops , no feed, no pasture, crop insurance is a different animal out west on dry land.

 

$30 will get you a gross of $150 to $180 then after a few years of losses the gross gets down in that $125 area. Odds become better in Vegas after a while.

 

Many here confuse a dry patch with drought.  A real drought is a cancer that is unstoppable, just keeps going til the patient is consumed.

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Mizzou_Tiger
Senior Advisor

Re: Just took one for the team

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Real drought?

And arid climate by nature is always in a drought comparatively speaking.

Just like a tropical climate by nature is always in a flood comparatively speaking.

I live in neither

But this I do know. Here it can be hot and dry. Cold and wet. Kinda good kinda bad and perfect.

And as of late these 3,4,5,6,7 inch gully washers have been coming every spring and since 2008 in multiple shots. It was not normal by short term standards but is quickly becoming the norm and it sucks
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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Just took one for the team

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Yea MT it is foolish to compare problems too much, but I think hobby has a point----- "naturally I would" ........ and I am not sure this applies, but out west we are holding our breath ------ after a 4 weeks of the kindest, most wonderful weather possible.  Where an inch takes two days to come and once a week we plant day and night for 36 hours before the next gentle rain.  This isn't right.  

 

The problem with dry years when you get 8-12 inches a year with lots of heat is that 8 inches comes in two shots of 4 inches in 30 minutes. We consider the big worthless rains the "effect" of dry years...... 

As the old guys used to say watching the crop burn up, "someone's going to pay for this".  They weren't talking about a subsidy, they were talking about what happens when the dry years break.  SW Ks in the 1930's lost nearly every crop, near half our population, etc etc ... and nearly every bridge to flash floods.  The 1950's drought ended with an April blizzard that killed most of the livestock and caved in buildings, the military dropped groceries to families with small children------------  It is terrible to get that much water all at once.  

 

But I think it is the result of the law of averages in drought years, and the drought to your west and southwest since 2010 is historic...

Doesn't help does it................

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