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BA Deere
Honored Advisor

Minnesota the new "Iowa"?

What? 190 corn PFT corn yield while Iowa is at 183   Whodat whodat??

BADeere_0-1661516402569.gif

 Well, you can`t have our Governor   😀

 

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5 Replies
rsbs
Senior Advisor

Re: Minnesota the new "Iowa"?

I purchased a couple of older farmall tractors in West Concord MN, Dodge County last week, and I have to say that all the fields I drove by over there appear to be 250 bushel bin busters. While we had three weeks of drought, I believe they caught some heavy early rains, and it shows.

Not sure about all the other areas, but that one alone will elevate another county's low average up into the stratosphere, too.

I will be happy with the 190, myself, if I can bin that, along with 55 bushel soybeans over hill, over dale.

 

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Blacksandfarmer
Senior Advisor

Re: Minnesota the new "Iowa"?

I'm glad for Minnesota. Speaking of northern corn, I don't believe the crop tour makes its way through the Red River valley in North Dakota, but I would be interested in knowing how that crop turned out given the rain events they had? Also, Wisconsin and Michigan look to have a big year. This could be a year the crop tour under shoots the yield numbers because they only check the heart of the cornbelt. Then the January (or is it February?) crop numbers come out and everybody wonders where the bushels came from... 

Given what the crop tour has found, the U.S corn crop comes in pretty "average" maybe a tick below trend. The real shame of it is the soybeans look soo good nearly everywhere but we just can't seem to get a whole Midwest soaking rain event to hit big yield. 

 

 

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mrwhitetrash200
Contributor

Re: Minnesota the new "Iowa"?

 

Being a 70+ year old land owner in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, weather patterns have changed, and water availability also.   It was a joke in Minnesota 30 years ago...dig down 3 feet and you will find water.  Not like that anymore.   Irrigation was unheard of....and now it is becoming popular.   Yields from my Mn farms have outdone my Iowa farms for the past 4 years.   All of my farms are of high fertility, prime farm ground.   I do feel that irrigation will have to be considered in the next 5-10 years as drought is becoming a more prevalent issue.   The most promising corn-soybean ground is my farms in the Fargo, ND area.   Never would have thought that 20 years ago.    It used to be a 10 day spread from the start of planting in Illinois (around Bloomington) to the Dodge county farms in Minnesota in the 1980's.   Not that way now....it is more like 2-5 days.  

  BA....you can have your stinking governor.

lsc76cat
Senior Advisor

Re: Minnesota the new "Iowa"?

SCMN - about 20 miles NE of Mankato

Been doing some scouting in our beans and am a bit concerned about what I'm seeing.

Plenty of bugs but so far the aphids are not a problem that justifies spraying.

What is concerning is the size of the beans in the pods.  Plants are healthy and full of pods.

Pods aren't flat and at this point the beans look more like lima beans.

This late in the season how much bigger will they get?  Planted 5/16, about 2 weeks later than normal for us.

Plenty of heat and sun and certainly not as short for rain as other areas.  Even some nice rains this month.

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rsbs
Senior Advisor

Re: Minnesota the new "Iowa"?

Hey, how big do you want them to get? One thing to remember when you harvest soybeans, is the yield adjustment you need to make to get real bushels. Big beans have lower test weights, as they have more air pockets between each bean, and you might have 53 or 54 lb tw soybeans in that 25000 corn bin, and only have 22000 bushels of soybeans to sell.

I think a lot of farmers "brag" about bean yields using corn bushels, but I guess that is just my idea. I know anything over 50 bushels per acre, over hill, and through the slough, is still a big yield for me once it actually gets scaled.

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