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Honored Advisor

Re: Now it's a drought

Blacksand: I didn't even think it was.

 

If anything my post was intended more as humor. But we in NO way have a crop made here either and with NO rain in the forecast in the 7 day with 98 degrees every day with that "breeze" irreguardless of when the crop gives it up, a shriveled up crop is a shriveled up crop.

 

I do not believe it would be prudent for me to put up any more picts of my crops right now. My nieghbors corn right out my drive on a clay rock pile is suffering today and will join yours in just a couple of days. Our soils are not great moisture holders with the exception of the river bottoms.

 

Mine is smaller and will hit "I need a rain bad" middle of next week. If one would show up sooner it would be fine too.

 

100_6335.JPG

This picture was taken the 16th of April THIS year. Now It is on the verge of a drought, Seems droughty times here end with a flood.

 

 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Now it's a drought

Simple enough. Take water from ditch B to field A.  It's just an itty bitty ways.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Now it's a drought

I knew you weren't the typt to mean insult.  However, you are right about how people in different areas percieve drought.

Some places, if the drain tile isn't running excess water off the field, or their corn curls a litte for a couple days, they think they are in the Gobi Desert.  After raising 35 BPA irrigated, and 13 BPA dryland corn (and that was the year I only planted dryland corn on the best bottomground) I kow what heat/drought stressed corn is all about.

Corn, like you pictured, can make a remarkable recovery, as long as it gets moisture, and plenty of it, before it tassels.  If tassels are starting to come out, your corn will not do very well.  One thing drought often does, is it throws off the timing between the tassel, and silks, as can extreme heat.  The 35 BPA irrigated corn I mentioned above, was a 'new' variety, that turned out not to be able to tolerate heat stress, and the heat caused the tassels to come out, well before the silks, and by the time the silks were ready to catch pollen, most of it had already dropped, and dried out.  There were puny ears, and even barren ones, in a field of corn that had never been moisture stressed from sprouting, to harvest.  At worst, there was a little 'heat curl' on the knobs, on the very hottest days. 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Now it's a drought

Hobbyfarmer, instead of posting pictures of great looking crops that most would like to have. I think we need to start posting the worst and have a contest for the worst looking LOL! I have seen worse in my area but don't think its right to go after the worst looking fields of my neighbors and post them..... We are already suffering enough here as it is. Nebraska farmer do you think my corn will make anything at all? I have never had corn look this bad.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Now it's a drought

Persoanlly, I think it all depends on when the pollen sheds, and when you get rain.  If you get rain, and soon, so the plant is somewhat healthy looking when the tassels come out, and the silks emerge in time to catch the pollen, I wouldn't be surprised if you still got 120 BU corn, provided it kept raining.

On the other hand, it doesn't look a whole lot better than my 13BPA corn did, at that time.  The tassels came out, pollen fell, the pollen dried up, and only then, did I see silks emerge.  Even though it rained some after that, all I gut were 'nubbins'. 

From my personal guess, I'd say somewhere between 20 & 120 BPA, depending on the weather from here on out, but with the potential dropping every day.  I hate to give such a wide window, but really, if it starts raining tomorrow, there is quite a bit of yield that can be salvaged. 

 

One thing, personally I don't have a lot of acres of row crops (roughly 200) with some furrow irrigated, and some under a pivot, and a little dryland.

With the furrow irrigation, I never worry about wind, or low humidity disrupting the watering of the crop.

However, with the pivot, I can 'cool' the field during pollenation (I use well water, which comes out of the ground around 55 degrees) with a quick 1/4 or 1/3 inch of water, during pollenation, which also adds humidity to the air in the field, and does wonders for pollenation.

On years where pollenation is not a problem, the furrow irrigation almost always is the better corn.

My dryland yields in the last 10 years have been from 13 to 160 BPA.  I guess that puts my dryland acres in what they call the 'fringe'.

I got myself a 'birthday' present, a digital camera coming from Amazon next week.  If I can figure it out, I hope to post a few pictures of what things are like here.  The biggest surprise are the heay fields.  We got about a 80-90% of normal first cutting, and second cutting on all dryland fields but one, will be non-existant.  The bulk of the field doesn't even have a green hue to it, 3 weeks after 1st cutting was put up.

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Honored Advisor

Re: Now it's a drought

 

BSF: wish I had taken a few picts on my parts run yesterday, many opportunities to get a pict of a disaster in the making ... some already made.

 

97 and a 17 mph wind out of the south is like two normal 82 degree days as far as moisture deprivation and stress on the crop especially when it does NOT cool at night.

 

I will like to see what Missery Tiger does about that 160/140 thing when the # come in at 120 or less. Probably have seen the last of bucky for a goodly amount of time. 5 to 7 more days of this and 120 will be optimistic

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Veteran Advisor

Sometimes Miracles Happen

I don't remember the year, but it was about seven years ago, I had a rented 40 acre field literally brown up before tasseling. I mean Brown, not wilted. You could hardly find a green spot.....this was late July, first part of August. THen it started raining and the field greened up and by harvest it had ears and a little over 100 bpa yield. This was not even VT3 corn or even BT corn but just the drought resistant early genetics that were common in the seed company that starts with a D, only from a local wholesaler company.

 

I would never have believed it without witnessing it.

 

Back in the nineties, I experienced the same thing with a June 21 frozen field where the field froze, turned brown and new green leaves emerged and went on to yield 150 bpa.

 

I hope you get some rain and get 100 bpa plus.

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Contributor

Re: Now it's a drought

why not put a relift in that ditch and  use you neighors irrigation water thats going right past you?

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