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Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

P S A # 1

Public Service Announcement #1

 

For the few who have grain at home in the bin...

 

Check it,

 

run the fans wait a few minutes smell the air 

 

Coming out.

 

The "lunch delivery ladies" yesterday said a few

guys are getting some nasty surprises. 

 

Almost $7 corn is a smidgen too valuable to just

 

Assume it's ok.

 

The bigger the Bin the longer it may take to do

 

the smell and feel for heat test.

 

No need to bust your hump planting this crop 

If not taking care of the last one.

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3 Replies
Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: P S A # 1

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Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: P S A # 1

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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: P S A # 1

Reminds me of an old farmers tale of his childhood in the 30's when he was in his late teens.  I farmed for the guy.

His family lived a couple mile from an older couple several miles north of Hooker, Oklahoma along the Kansas border.

The elder couple had homesteaded the land where they lived.  The wife had chickens, a couple of pigs and two milk cows-a productive windmill and a fair sized garden.  They had been in the area long enough to be established yet very tight financially and had invested in other farm land in the area. Seeing value and opportunity.   My landowners family rented a quarter of farmland from those folks and he clearly remembers his father transporting grain sorghum and wheat as directed to their house and dumping it in the yard.  They wanted their share, delivered.  By 1933 there were several sizable piles... they had acquired land as folks left the area by the end of the 30's a few rains came and she went to hooker and bought some wooden granaries -- or at least material to build them. Soon 4 young men from the school in the area were hired to scoop grain into the granaries with some storage loss to her livestock over time.  

When the war started in Europe and the US began to prepare she finally got her market move from the less than a 40 cents a bushel for wheat(which she considered "chicken feed") of the 30's to the $2 range no matter how it smelled.

My long time friend said he and his brother over a two years time pitched 14 years of wheat and feed grain into an old truck & deliver to the elevator where he was sure she got a few cents discount from the $2+, and his dad had an opportunity to farm another 320 acres of Hanke ground.... That grain was from three different counties in the area.

My father and I 20 years later farmed a different 320 acres of Hanke Estate land.

Not everyone in the dust bowl left or failed.... Living conditions just weren't for everyone and survival was the key.  Below those acres was water and best of all natural gas.  In the 1940's gas was discovered and the Hankes had monthly cash to invest in land, their idea of a valuable asset, while most were so poor that free gas to a house was enough to sign a lease.  While a few held out and decided they could afford to drill their own gas well.  Some of the best wells in the field belonged to the few farmer who had been able to save for a few years. near 3 counties had 100% producing wells.

Conditions always change..... even though it is hard to see how.

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