cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Palouser ---- playing our last card.

This is the one thing we can do to stop it for a while.  Irrigation circle to the right is planted.  We will stop the damage for a while.

 

IMG_0563.JPG

 

Today, Sunday --South to sw wind with gusts 45-50.   Monday North winds with gusts to 45.

0 Kudos
5 Replies
Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: Palouser ---- playing our last card.

Man o man is it ever brown out there, might just have to make a road trip .

0 Kudos
Palouser
Senior Advisor

Re: Palouser ---- playing our last card.

I'm curious about the use of a plow under these circumstances. As opposed to a chisel or something. Or soes that have anything to do with it?

0 Kudos
NateWCMN
Frequent Contributor

Re: Palouser ---- playing our last card.

Palouser - Looks like he's using the plow to loosen up the soil so he can create furrows and ridges with the tractor duals.

 

SW - Am I right?

 

Couple more questions - Did people in your area use lister planters on the dryland at one time?  Does anyone make beds and flood irrigate out there anymore?

0 Kudos
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Palouser ---- playing our last card.

 

We have a deep sandy loam. We have regular heavy winds in the fall and spring (october & March).  Over the years, even with good cover and good rains, the soil surface changes some.  The surface tends to have a higher concentration of sand with better clays below.  My dad thought it was because the sand particles are bigger and heavier than the clay so it stays over time.

Wind does something else to our soil.  It creates a hard crust just below the loose worked soil.  No-til has moved that crusting closer to the surface.  We are fighting that wind created crust on our irrigated circles as well.

 

Here's the theory.  

We have a surface of blowing sand 1/2 to 1 inch then a hard crust of 2-3 inches.  Below that is better soil and moisture protected by the crust from the wind.---- This was 2013 wheat stubble, chemical fallowed and has had about 8 inches of rain since last June- mostly in the fall..  But the stubble was only 3 inches tall and very weak.  The wind this spring have been overwhelming, as I type we have a 55 mph north wind blasting us. 

The process is two fold.  The plow, at about 12-14 inches brings up better textured soil and moisture. Then sends down the dry sand on the surface.

If we do nothing else the wind will dry out as deep as the plow ran.

So the packing is the second part.  Tractor packing saves most of the moisture by compacting.  The new surface soil has much less sand and will handle the wind until we can get a crop planted.  By packing and preserving some of the moisture we can plant it to grain sorghum on a 3/4 inch rain without working the ground, get the crop growing and survive for 30 to 60 days til we can get another  rain.

 

It works once -------------- Improves the soil for several years ----------- but if you loose control of it after plowing there is no good answer.

 

And if you don't bring up good moisture the first pass, you hide the plow in a spot where you won't be tempted to try it again.

0 Kudos
sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Palouser ---- playing our last card.

Nate your partially right.  The ridges created by packing do help with the wind damage, but the main reason for packing is to keep it from drying out deep.

 

Second question ---Listers -----   You are absolutely right.  Prior to herbicides and no-til.  The lister and planting in the furrow of ridges was the principle wind control for a summer crop.

 

Flood irrigation in ridges has left our area almost completely because of the more effecient center pivot sprinklers.

Our sandy loam soil takes and gives up water in greater degrees than tighter soils so flood irrigation tended to be more wasteful.

That trait also accounts for our decent yields in a low rainfall area.

 

It is a testiment to no-til and chemical fallow that we are just now getting blowing ground problems.  To make those programs work you have to raise a crop to provide the cover to prevent wind erosion.  We haven't had a harvestable crop on much of our dry land since 2010.  We are finally running out of cover to control the wind erosion.  I think that is pretty amazing.

0 Kudos