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Senior Advisor

Question regarding rain in the southern Plains

How much wheat that survived the drought and nearly ready to harvest is being adversly affected by rain? What areas might those be?

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5 Replies
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Senior Contributor

Re: Question regarding rain in the southern Plains

I doubt if it's hurting much of anything yet. The truth is it's adding bushels and test weight to anything left in Kansas and most of Oklahoma. It's not a problem yet.
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Re: Question regarding rain in the southern Plains

The truth is all the rain we've had here right at harvest time in Oklahoma is hurting the quality of the wheat tremendously.  Not complaining about the rain but what wheat we will have to harvest will not be what it would have been.  The rain isn't adding any bushels to the Oklahoma crop and I doubt it's adding much to the Kansas crop since it was near harvest as well.  Getting 7" of rain right at harvest time is taking away test weight and reducing bushels.

 

It is a problem.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: Question regarding rain in the southern Plains

I agree TW !! If your some where in between enid and Manchester the straw has turned black!! Will be a cloud of black dust in many areas and test weights will drop!! Started out 57/58 test , look for 55 and lower now, with more rain predicted Thursday ?? Saw some sprouting in sucker heads , but wind and sunshine stopped it!! Have 500 acres of canola down , storms and wind have shattered it badly!! In afternoon you just touch those pods and they shatter!!! Oh joy
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Question regarding rain in the southern Plains

M-Farmer, I've had many problems with wind blowing swaths and shattering so I've switched to straight cutting canola. I do a 1000 acres a year straight now and will never go back to swathing.
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Honored Advisor

Re: Question regarding rain in the southern Plains

Tw  I agree,

 

I would say the dividing line of benefit vs: damage is somewhere north of I-70 now.  The northern counties of Kansas.

 

Sw ks there are little sucker heads at 3 inches that will be mush at harvest or if we wait to for the suckers to finish the original heads will be on the ground.  Neither are good and the total of the two won't make the area average 8 bu per acre.

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