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bikinkawboy
Veteran Contributor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

" we must punish those who produce."  Apparently you weren't farming in the 1990's.  We had LDP payments and if the price of grain dropped below a certain point, the gov made up the difference.  Sound familiar?  One year (93?) Iowa and Illinois had a bumper crop and us folks in Missouri had a bad drought, like 20-30 bu corn.  The price was down, LDP kicked in and who made out like bandits?  The guys who had a failed crop and needed it most?  No, the guys with the bumper crops, not us guys with barely enough corn to cover the bin floor.  They had plenty of grain to sell and got a big, fat check and we had no grain to sell, therefore we got nothing.  And there were no crop insurance subsidies back then, meaning nearly everyone was uninsured. 

 

Not wanting to hack anyone off, but a few years ago when feed corn cost $8 at the elevator and I couldn't afford to buy any for my livestock, I didn't hear any of you corn producers crying about the livestock producer's plight.  Regardless of the details, usually for every winner there is at least one loser and today's winner may be tomorrow's loser.  Don't worry, it'll turn around one of these days and you'll again be crowing like a rooster.     

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marketeye
Veteran Advisor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

Yes, August rains. Nov. soybean futures are off 55¢, on the week, and it's only Tuesday. And to boot, the USDA has announced big, fresh, soybean sales each day this week. In other words, August rains trump the big demand.

 

Mike

 

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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

Bikini,   Are you trying to make me believe that the LDP is the only subsidy you got from usda in the 90's....

 

I am slow, but not that slow....  And insurance for your crops has always been there, just not always ripping off the tax payer style.

I remember the 90's when I got rich marketing my $1 corn through my 9 cents a pound hogs...

 

There is no envy like the envy of Missouri for its neighbors.

 

🙂    Have a good market down day 

bikinkawboy
Veteran Contributor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

Yeah, you Iowa, Indiana and Illinois guys don't know how good you got it, weather wise.  In the 1960's and 70s there were lots, and I mean lots of farmers from those states that moved to Missouri, including my family.  Most went broke also.  The flat ground looks like Illinois and the rolling ground looks like Iowa, except the topsoil is a lot thinner and retains less moisture.  Our annual rainfall may be about the same, it is much more variable.  We can have Iowa winter, Illinois rainfall, Kansas drought or Arkansas humidity.

 

In the last 50 years I can remember two years when we had 20" of rain during the month of October, don't think that slows harvest.  Or Labor Day of 2004 when I got 13.25" in less than 18 hours.  Our high clay soil have high shrink-swell rates and in really dry times it's not uncommon to have cracks in the ground wide enough to stick my wrist in.  I've literally had T posts fall through the cracks with the bottom strand of wire resting on the ground surface.  I've been able to dangle a 10' ground rod in cracks without hitting bottom.  The shrink-swell is hell on basement walls to be sure.  One old timer told me we are 2 weeks away from a drought and 2 inches away from a flood...there's a lot of truth in that.  If dad hadn't stopped thinking like an Illinois farmer and started thinking like a Missourian, we would have went broke. 

 

As Walter Brennen used to say on that TV western show, "No brag, just fact."  And I'm not complaining, I just know that we don't have the soil and weather advantages surrounding states do.  But then again, we don't have the land prices or property taxes like many surrounding states also have.  Incidentally, besides farming I've worked for SCS-SWCD-NRCS for 38 years, so I know a thing or two about FSA programs, soils, etc. 

OKdon
Senior Contributor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

Yeah but! you got high quality cheap fertilizer out of thos pigs.we are tough guys though. A manly man dusts himself off and does it again. I'll bet the bulk of the corn farmers take their planters to the field next spring.

bikinkawboy
Veteran Contributor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

I think "glutton for punishment" is the term you're looking for.

sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

I missread it there Bikini.............. I take back that kudo........

 

I thought it said     Gluten for punishment ................. and was totally lost in a feeling of..................................... back when this site  wasn't so anally attentive........

Careful about those "real men" references these days, Don.

 

Oh and will they plant?,,,,,,, do they have a choice?    That is the part you leave out don... 

They got the equipment and know where the land is.  

After all, with us well on our way to $1.50 con, even while we take a breath here at $3, not even Deere wants used Deere equipment, might as well keep using it.

 

They will sell you some new at high prices and try hard not to finance it.

 

The handwriting on the wall doesn't get much bigger and bolder than that.

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bikinkawboy
Veteran Contributor

Re: Reply to "soybeans down 41, August rains"

Looks like we have some thin skinned folks here.  As for glutton for punishment, all farmers are.  We like or derive satisfaction from what we do and therefore we keep going back for more, even when things are going totally against us.  Anyone with more than one kid understands the feeling completly.

 

As for whining, again that's something we farmer all do, especally when it comes to the weather and commodity prices.  Does it do any good?  No.  A point I was trying to make is that everyone looks out for himself, regardless of the circumstances.  The corn-bean guy wants a big rain while at the same time the guy with hay down doesn't want it.  The corn farmer wants high prices and the livestock producer wants low cornprices.  That's just the way it goes.  But for you grain producers to think you're suffering so badly and deserve sympathy, like I said before, you sure didn't have any sympathy for livestock producers when corn was sky high.  

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