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Honored Advisor

Senator Grassley

The R senator from Iowa thinks the new House Farm bill is atrocious. Is going to vote against it.  (he is the only "farmer" in the senate)

 

Thinks a few Southern Gentleman Farmers in the South are gameing/rapeing the system.

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10 Replies
Senior Contributor

Re: Senator Grassley

The only farmer in the senate voting against it should tell everyone something.
Veteran Contributor

Re: Senator Grassley

From what I have heard the farm bill bends to the southern farmers, in particular rice farmers.  Something about 800 an acre revenue protection on corn.  So if that is true we will be farming for LDP's again, in my opinion.

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Advisor

Re: Senator Grassley

It , somehow, has to be ethanol's fault.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Senator Grassley

IDA has seen the light! LOL

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Esteemed Advisor

Re: Senator Grassley

The only farmer in the House from Indiana (Stutzman) also voted against it. Not sure his reasoning but he is a good man so I trust he had a good reason. Not sure anyone knows what is in the 1,000 page bill yet. Most haven't read even a portion of it.

 

 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Senator Grassley

If no one has read it, then who wrote it?
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Honored Advisor

Re: Senator Grassley

Then there will be the "go where it wants to"  writing of the implementing regulations by the administration.  No matter what the bill says it will mean what the writers of the regulation manuel want it to.

 

If the bill passes the public will be appeased.  Then we write the regs.

 

I would probably vote against it just to take away another opportunity for an administration to place the carbon footprint closer to our throats. --------- or heavier on..................

 

I don't have much faith in the idea there is any support for agriculture in the administration right now. 

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Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Senator Grassley

(With apologies to the late radio great Paul Harvey. )
 

And on the eighth day, God looked down on his planned paradise and said, "I need a caretaker." So God made a farmer.

 

God said, "I need somebody willing to get up before dawn, milk cows, work all day in the fields, milk cows again, and then go to Washington and claim that this particular type of hard work is somehow unique in America and ought to be underwritten by the rest of the nation. I need a willing audience for that plea—a group clever enough and self-serving enough to see the electoral profit of standing for Carhartts, wheat fields and John Deere tractors." So God made a Congress.

 

He said, "I need somebody in that Congress savvy enough to realize that farming means food, and food means nutrition, and nutrition means good things to voters, so farming means food stamps. Somebody to call to make that assistance bigger and forever, tame howls over soaring deficits, and plant the seeds of perpetual votes. Somebody to threaten to label anybody pushing for reform as rich, cruel and downright hateful of happy, cornfed children playing in hay lofts—and mean it." So God made a Democratic Party.

 

God said, "I need somebody willing to spend five long years complaining about overspending, big government and special-interest giveaways. And get up and vote for $1 trillion in overspending, bigger government and special-interest giveaways—in the name of farmers. Then—when reminded of his reform promises—dry his eyes and say, 'Maybe next year.' I need somebody to fret about drought, wax about food security, and muse (in private) that heedless government shutdowns really do have consequences. Including pressuring parties to prove they can accomplish something by voting for 949-page spending extravaganzas that nobody has bothered to read. Somebody willing to put in 40 hours spinning excuses for abandoning his principles and then, pained from the camera lights, put in 70 hours more." So God made Republicans.

 

God had to have Democrats and Republicans willing to cast aside their differences in the name of handouts, and bale a legislative vehicle together with the strong bonds of self-interest. A vehicle that would combine food stamps and farm pork and thereby guarantee a coalition so powerful that it could mow over procedural ruts, race ahead of political rain and hogtie pesky opponents. A vehicle so unstoppable that its creators would laugh and then sigh, and then reply, with smiling eyes, when the reformers vowed change: "Good luck, suckers." So God made a farm bill.
 

God said: "I need somebody mighty enough to divert money to those who need it least, yet sneaky enough to do it behind closed doors. I need somebody to wheedle, deal, logroll, beg, trade, and cajole subsidy checks for corporate agribusiness, sushi rice, catfish, Christmas-tree promotion boards, biorefineries and at least 15 sitting members of Congress. Somebody to make sure there are no caps on subsidies and no asset tests for food stamps. Somebody in a nice suit. Somebody who has never been on a farm." So God made lobbyists.

He said, "I need somebody or something to help patriotic Americans forget that 80% of that 'farm' bill is going to welfare, and most of the rest to sugar barons and cotton kings who vacation in Mallorca. Somebody or something to ensure people don't get to wondering why it is we have a 'farm' bill when we don't have a 'laptop' bill, or a 'vampire-novel' bill or a 'swing-set' bill in this free-market economy that Americans supposedly prize. Somebody or something who will so inspire the public with homespun images of clapboard churches and cows, leathery men holding rope, sheepdogs, plaid shirts, cowboy hats, and American flags that folks will entirely fail to realize that the people pictured—the hardworking souls tilling the back 40—are these days the last to see a dime of farm-bill money." So God made Ram pickup trucks and Super Bowl commercials.

 

Finally, God looked down on all he'd created and He said: "Now I need somebody who really will work hard. Somebody who'll get up day in and day out to plow through traffic to work, come home to help the kids and make the dinner and do the laundry, and struggle with the bills, and get up to do it all over again.

 

"Somebody who will limit himself to dreaming about that Ram pickup truck he can't afford—because the IRS bill is due, and because the government-inflated cost of groceries and gas sure do make things tight, and because his own small business, which he built with his own sweat, doesn't qualify for any handouts. I need somebody to spend his life paying for this week's farm extravaganza, somebody who Congress made sure had no **bleep** choice in the matter."

 

So God made a taxpayer.

 

This was penned by Kimberly Strassel in the WSJ on Jan. 30.   The only ones she missed making fun of in all this,  is the bankers and the crop insurance companies who are the real recipients of the "subsidies".  

 

 

 

Veteran Advisor

Re: Senator Grassley

jput  -  very interesting  !

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