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Senior Advisor

Re: This is a must see video

you answered my question............they are going to grow corn on corn on corn.........so if its not GMO, it will be some nasty SAI.............that or go organic, which probably means bankrupt because the cost and yield hit would mean $20 corn...........you thought $7 was high...........

 

EDIT:  went onto the shopping guide...........found a pork outfit in WA that "supposedly" doesnt use any GMO feed..........you can buy pork for $8 to $12 per pound................thats about a 4 to 5X increase............

 

again, I am not saying one way or another.............but when someone is willing to fork out $300 or $800 for a new iphone or ipad every two years, while struggling to make house payments and put groceries on the table..........THIS COUNTRIES LIP SERVICE AND PRIORITIES ARE ROYALLY SCREWED UP............

 

 

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Veteran Contributor

Re: This is a must see video

Again rotating crops is not organic.  It would be impossible for those having high land costs to do this so they would not be able to get a premium for their product or belly up because there is not market for GMO grain, but it is a free market.  Ethanol probably has a short life span if this scenario plays out IMHO and thus no need for continous corn.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: This is a must see video

Just found your questions.  I was late to the RR bandwagon so Rup beans since 2000 and then 3 years later used RR corn.  I did some test strips before I started planting nonGMO and did not have a problem, that was 3 years ago.  The life of Rup in the soil has too many variables, yearly rainfall, soiltype etc. but a halflife of anywhere from 3-20 years.  I did teststrips to verify if there would be a problem, so that is how I would answer that question.

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Senior Advisor

Re: This is a must see video

Thanks Mike, I appreciate your input.  Although I live in an area where the bulk of our crops are not RR.  I didn't say there weren't any, just not as many of them.  Years ago, I thought sorghum was getting left in the dust since there wasn't any RR varieties being developed.  After many years of some areas planting year after year of RR technology, we don't have the same issues as those areas.  Sometimes your unanswered prayers are prayers in themselves.

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Senior Advisor

Re: This is a must see video

its the age old dilemma...............once you start to go down the road of a monoculture, things get interesting.........

 

this country has flourished on a cheap and reliable food system...........the laws of capitalism and survival tell us to find more efficiencies..........naturally we shift from organic free range type ecosystems...........and gravitate towards controlled confinement and highly focused monoculture ecosystems...........

 

honestly..........we have not been intensively focused on monoculture/confinement systems long enough to know their true side effects...........good or bad..........and IMO these systems are a product of society,not necessarily BIG AG..........

 

also, question for you...........many that are against GMO say its bad because it introduces things where they normally shouldn't be, and thats bad, its not natural..........i know that's a very simplistic way to paint that thought, but its basically the underlining theme................so my question is..............we have resistance in all kinds of things in this world..........we have bacteria resistant to antibiotics.........which by the way, antibiotics that probably were never meant for human use.............we have viruses resistant to certain vaccines or cures................we have insects, weeds, fungus, etc resistant to all kinds of pesticides.............IF RESISTANCE TO WHATEVER CAN OCCUR THRU NATURAL SELECTION PROCESSES................WHAT DIFFERENTIATES THAT AND GMO'S.....................

 

its a valid question, because I am willing to bet that if we screened enough soybean plants, native or otherwise..........thru natural processes..........we probably would have found one at least tolerant if not full blown resistant to glyphosate..........I mean weeds do it, they have been doing it for decades, and FYI by definition a weed is nothing more than an unwanted plant, just like volunteer corn is a weed in a soybean field...............

 

Again, I am just asking the question...........

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Advisor

Re: This is a must see video

Mike - the fella that helps me plant in the spring and harvest in the fall, over the years has been hauling organic beans and corn from Minnesota to a shipping terminal in Nebraska, where it is shipped to Calfornia. The prices received the past few years were about four times the price received for the nonorganic crop.  Plus . . . they did not want the grain cleaned before delivery.  Kinda Interesting.  John

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Senior Advisor

Re: This is a must see video

Faust, that very well could have been a million dollar comment.  You just proved that there are markets for these non GMO crops.  The hardest part is just finding the correct market and matching it with the commodity.  I guess this is known as logistics.

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Veteran Contributor

Re: This is a must see video

I would say resistance is the function of overuse or overreliance.  The mantra now is rotate chemistries for control of resistance.  When Rup was in its infancy Monsanto in its great wisdom (tongue in cheek) recomended multiple applications of Rup instead of multiple chemistries and look at how that has gone.  Yes I too believe there could be a  natural resistance found in beans but how could Monsanto patent that and profit? 

 

You had one other question that I missed.  Paraphrased, why do consumer want organic to satisfy the perceived need for nonGMO grain.  My assesment would be that is the only way they can gaurentee that the are getting a nonGMO product.  If you had a more conventionally grown gauranteed nonGmo product I think that would be considered acceptable.  Again that is MHO.

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Senior Advisor

Re: This is a must see video

that wasnt my question..........

 

I am curious what the difference is between a GMO and natural selection..........

 

FYI, when a species exhibits resistance to something, that would otherwise kill the native or susceptible populations............its usually a naturally occuring non lethal mutation...............IE the resistance is naturally occuring, we have just selected for it via an environment change or monoculture.............

 

thus what is the difference between this naturally occuring non lethal mutation.........and GMO..........

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Veteran Contributor

Re: This is a must see video

Again this is out of my area of knowledge but from what I have heard in the video and in previous reading, it is the crossing of unlike species(?) that causes mutations that lower our defenses and create new pathways for disease and virus to attack us.  This is my interpretation of what was in the above video.  Maybe someone else will comment on that.  Where natural selection would be within species(?)  The argument has been made that hybridization is a GMO but that would be natural selection as I heard that defended which makes sense as that is within species.

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