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Senior Advisor

This is where I do what I do

No, we don't go back and forth in straight lines. We contour the slopes. The marginal areas that look like waste ground w/ a few trees or brush - are WAY too steep to farm. You'd have to have 3-D to see it. I farm about an hour to the East in SE Washington and Idaho and have more trees, but you can get an idea. We need leveling combines.

 

The bottom pic can be enlarged by clicking in the lower right corner. You get a bigger view. Picture thousands of square miles like this - or even more rugged where glacial floods out of Montana scoured out canyons.

 

http://space.io9.com/this-rugged-carpet-is-washington-state-from-space-472615482

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4 Replies
Honored Advisor

Re: This is where I do what I do

Palouser,

 

I see from reading that The "man destroys the pristene native earth" element is still alive and well...

 

Every time i am in that region, I try to imagine how the Columbia river basin looked 200 yrs ago.  Uncontrolled it must have been a wild mess.

 

There are some massive and amazing accomplishments throughout that area.

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Senior Advisor

Re: This is where I do what I do

Always wondered if the coffee chain got it's start from the little village near you when traveling from Vantage to Lewiston ---

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Veteran Advisor

Re: This is where I do what I do

Beautiful photos. look like shiny scales of a huge fish

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Senior Advisor

Re: This is where I do what I do

The original Palouse Prairie would have been stunning. I know of only one little tiny piece on good ground near me that has survived and it is unbelievable. The constant progression of flowers in the native short bunch grass through the summer is hard to believe. From wild iris to orchids to blanket flower. But the ground was fertile and when techniques to farm the hills were figured out it probably all vanished in a few years. There are many patches on very steep hillsides with trees but almost nothing out in the open.

 

Early farming on the Palouse was extremely distructive due to the slopes, though I know that flat Midwest ground is still subject to similar treatment. Ohio Bluetip cultivators were the way to go and summer fallow on ground that never should have been fallowed because of the erosion over the next winter. Some of that really didn't end until the eighties, sad to say. Practices are so much better.

 

But I know of light soil areas on the Plains where stubble is still routinely burned at the same time complaints are made about blowing soil. I mean - think about it!