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Tid Bits

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Went to Des Moines to supervise the unloading and placement of these two shrimp tanks this morning. No they are not that heavy, just the truck that brought them up from the penitentry in Mississippi where they are made by inmates.  

 

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Just some of the plumbing and equip

 

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First tank in but not leveled up yet. Going from a truck service bay to shrimp farm in Des Moines area, In city.

 

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Winterset Iowa is dredging their lake/municipal water supply and installing a new overflow spillway. 7+ inches of rain yesterday and there is going to be some do over Tuesday. They were just getting a good start on it when this happened this morning. Stopped to get this picture and a short vidieo on the way up to get the tanks unloaded.

 

Now the marketing part of this post. Called the local grain terminal this afternoon and left them a bean offer to sell, was really surprised they didn't laugh. They accepted it without a snicker, doubt if it will fly but will know by middle of next week when the offer expires.

 

Sixty thousand dollar option seen at the FPS.  Makes the drawbar 3 feet off the ground.

 

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Honored Advisor

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This mornings pictures

 

Two Saturday's in a row in Aug.  the dry month.

 

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Water is going down was over the road just a few minutes earlier.

 

Rain makes grain, should be a blow my doors off biggie here.

 

 

 

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Right afternoon my son brought down his Yamaha's... well we ruined the rest of the day having more fun than a grandpa should have.

 

up river.JPGup river 2.JPGup river 1.JPG

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Last surviving Hindenburg crew member dies at 92

Hindenburgcrewman640.jpg

An undated photo, left, provided by John Provan shows Werner Franz, the last surviving crew member of the Hindenburg airship disaster, right, 77 years ago. Franz died Aug. 13 in Frankfurt, Germany. Franz was a cabin boy on the Hindenburg, making three journeys to South America and one to North America before the disaster. (AP Photo/dpa, John Provan)

 

Werner Franz, believed to be the last surviving crew member of the German airship Hindenburg that crashed 77 years ago, has died. He was 92.

 

Franz was a 14-year-old cabin boy when the hydrogen-filled Zeppelin caught fire and crashed in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. The disaster was captured by waiting photographers, film crews and a radio broadcaster on the ground, making it one of history's most iconic air accidents.

 

Luck and quick thinking meant Franz was able to jump out of the Hindenburg as it fell burning to the ground, said historian John Provan, a long-time friend.

 

"Werner survived the crash without a scratch on him," Provan said.

 

Franz returned to Germany and served as an aircraft technician during World War II, and was a roller- and ice skating coach in later life. He spoke freely about his experience, said Carl Jablonski, president of the Navy Lakehurst Historical Society, who last met Franz at an event commemorating the 70th anniversary of the disaster that killed 35 of the 97 people on board and a Navy crewman on the ground.

 

Provan confirmed a report by German news agency dpa, quoting his widow Annerose, that Franz died of heart failure Aug. 13 in his hometown of Frankfurt.

 

Franz came to be on the Hindenburg by chance, Provan told The Associated Press.

 

"His older brother worked at a fancy hotel in Frankfurt where the passengers and the captain stayed overnight before the airship took off early in the morning," he said. "One of the captains said they were looking for a cabin boy and (his brother) heard about it."

Franz completed three journeys to South America and one to North America before the disaster.

 

The huge airship — as long as three football fields and 15 stories tall — was considered the most luxurious means to cross the Atlantic at the time. Its loss — widely attributed to static electricity that ignited leaking hydrogen — was a heavy blow to the image of a resurgent Germany that the Nazis wanted to project to the world.

 

"Werner was most fortunate because he was in the officers' mess cleaning up," said Provan. "Above him was a large tank of water that burst open and drenched him, which protected him a bit from the flames and the heat."

 

Franz was able to jump out of a cloth supply hatch onto the ground below and made the wise decision to run into the wind.

"He didn't make the mistake of going in the other direction or the flames would have caught him," Provan said.

 

Jablonski said three other survivors of the disaster are believed to be still alive today. Werner Doehner and Horst Schirmer, who were both passengers aboard the Hindenburg, and Robert Buchanan, a member of the ground crew that was waiting to moor the ship.

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Last surviving Hindenburg crew member dies at 92

Hindenburgcrewman640.jpg

An undated photo, left, provided by John Provan shows Werner Franz, the last surviving crew member of the Hindenburg airship disaster, right, 77 years ago. Franz died Aug. 13 in Frankfurt, Germany. Franz was a cabin boy on the Hindenburg, making three journeys to South America and one to North America before the disaster. (AP Photo/dpa, John Provan)

 

Werner Franz, believed to be the last surviving crew member of the German airship Hindenburg that crashed 77 years ago, has died. He was 92.

 

Franz was a 14-year-old cabin boy when the hydrogen-filled Zeppelin caught fire and crashed in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. The disaster was captured by waiting photographers, film crews and a radio broadcaster on the ground, making it one of history's most iconic air accidents.

 

Luck and quick thinking meant Franz was able to jump out of the Hindenburg as it fell burning to the ground, said historian John Provan, a long-time friend.

 

"Werner survived the crash without a scratch on him," Provan said.

 

Franz returned to Germany and served as an aircraft technician during World War II, and was a roller- and ice skating coach in later life. He spoke freely about his experience, said Carl Jablonski, president of the Navy Lakehurst Historical Society, who last met Franz at an event commemorating the 70th anniversary of the disaster that killed 35 of the 97 people on board and a Navy crewman on the ground.

 

Provan confirmed a report by German news agency dpa, quoting his widow Annerose, that Franz died of heart failure Aug. 13 in his hometown of Frankfurt.

 

Franz came to be on the Hindenburg by chance, Provan told The Associated Press.

 

"His older brother worked at a fancy hotel in Frankfurt where the passengers and the captain stayed overnight before the airship took off early in the morning," he said. "One of the captains said they were looking for a cabin boy and (his brother) heard about it."

Franz completed three journeys to South America and one to North America before the disaster.

 

The huge airship — as long as three football fields and 15 stories tall — was considered the most luxurious means to cross the Atlantic at the time. Its loss — widely attributed to static electricity that ignited leaking hydrogen — was a heavy blow to the image of a resurgent Germany that the Nazis wanted to project to the world.

 

"Werner was most fortunate because he was in the officers' mess cleaning up," said Provan. "Above him was a large tank of water that burst open and drenched him, which protected him a bit from the flames and the heat."

 

Franz was able to jump out of a cloth supply hatch onto the ground below and made the wise decision to run into the wind.

"He didn't make the mistake of going in the other direction or the flames would have caught him," Provan said.

 

Jablonski said three other survivors of the disaster are believed to be still alive today. Werner Doehner and Horst Schirmer, who were both passengers aboard the Hindenburg, and Robert Buchanan, a member of the ground crew that was waiting to moor the ship.

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Last surviving Hindenburg crew member dies at 92

Hindenburgcrewman640.jpg

An undated photo, left, provided by John Provan shows Werner Franz, the last surviving crew member of the Hindenburg airship disaster, right, 77 years ago. Franz died Aug. 13 in Frankfurt, Germany. Franz was a cabin boy on the Hindenburg, making three journeys to South America and one to North America before the disaster. (AP Photo/dpa, John Provan)

 

Werner Franz, believed to be the last surviving crew member of the German airship Hindenburg that crashed 77 years ago, has died. He was 92.

 

Franz was a 14-year-old cabin boy when the hydrogen-filled Zeppelin caught fire and crashed in Lakehurst, New Jersey, on May 6, 1937. The disaster was captured by waiting photographers, film crews and a radio broadcaster on the ground, making it one of history's most iconic air accidents.

 

Luck and quick thinking meant Franz was able to jump out of the Hindenburg as it fell burning to the ground, said historian John Provan, a long-time friend.

 

"Werner survived the crash without a scratch on him," Provan said.

 

Franz returned to Germany and served as an aircraft technician during World War II, and was a roller- and ice skating coach in later life. He spoke freely about his experience, said Carl Jablonski, president of the Navy Lakehurst Historical Society, who last met Franz at an event commemorating the 70th anniversary of the disaster that killed 35 of the 97 people on board and a Navy crewman on the ground.

 

Provan confirmed a report by German news agency dpa, quoting his widow Annerose, that Franz died of heart failure Aug. 13 in his hometown of Frankfurt.

 

Franz came to be on the Hindenburg by chance, Provan told The Associated Press.

 

"His older brother worked at a fancy hotel in Frankfurt where the passengers and the captain stayed overnight before the airship took off early in the morning," he said. "One of the captains said they were looking for a cabin boy and (his brother) heard about it."

Franz completed three journeys to South America and one to North America before the disaster.

 

The huge airship — as long as three football fields and 15 stories tall — was considered the most luxurious means to cross the Atlantic at the time. Its loss — widely attributed to static electricity that ignited leaking hydrogen — was a heavy blow to the image of a resurgent Germany

 

"Werner was most fortunate because he was in the officers' mess cleaning up," said Provan. "Above him was a large tank of water that burst open and drenched him, which protected him a bit from the flames and the heat."

 

Franz was able to jump out of a cloth supply hatch onto the ground below and made the wise decision to run into the wind.

"He didn't make the mistake of going in the other direction or the flames would have caught him," Provan said.

 

Jablonski said three other survivors of the disaster are believed to be still alive today. Werner Doehner and Horst Schirmer, who were both passengers aboard the Hindenburg, and Robert Buchanan, a member of the ground crew that was waiting to moor the ship.

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Hobby, was this your first time jet skiing in a corn field?
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Yes first time with a jet ski
Have done it several times in a canoe
Jet ski way more fun.
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Well today it was bridge to bridge on the Des Moines river. (high tressle to Kate Shelly)

ResizedImage_1409519981046.jpgbridge to bridge.JPGbridge to bridge 2.JPGbridge to bridge 1.JPGResizedImage_1409520009540.jpgResizedImage_1409519954805.jpg

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