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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

Hobby, 

 

Were observing some above normal tipping back in the corn in fields without much reason.  Heat normal for us , maybe lower than normal.

 

Gotta theory to run by ya,   Would that week of cool --- low 60's weather when we looked for the jacket in the mornings,  followed by a week of 100's bring on the tipping back.  or would the last third of the cob just get delayed a week,  or did the cool interrupt polination??

 

Got a lot of corn in milk stage,  two to 3 wks behind for us.

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Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

SW you are asking the wrong person those questions...that being said. The tip is the last to pollinate and probably did it in the hot dry wind under stress and, ... well... didn't do it. 40 degree temp swing is stressfull, especially going from cool to too hot. Race horse hybrid?

 

A little off topic here but I haven't had a good feeling about this year since March. I am being proved right here on my place. That is not true for high ground around here. Some of the best ever if not on river bottom.

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Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

ResizedImage_1407605119675.jpg

 

This was the "twins" picture I thought I was posting. Going from way too wet for more than a month to way too dry (no rain for almost a month) may have an effect that will be seen by the combine. the top of all these plants are growing new growth and just putting out new flowers so who knows?  Still no sunshine since last Tues and it wasn't bright.

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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

Drought and the like in consideration -- a week ago tuesday the area had 1.5 inches (the one that gave the shop area 3+ inches) slow and nice.  Dry land milo which had not hurt much but was slow to develope(rains coming late) suddenly looked very good and the following tuesday were trying to shoot heads and turning white under stress.  Another half inch on wednesday slowed the stress for an afternoon.

 

 

Corn--- Race horse--- Very possible.  The green snap issue earlier in the year is another indication.

We have such a unique climate that we need years of testing and experience with hybrids to know which varieties fit us best.  Pioneer for instance had a growing/research/testing farm and plant at Garden City for years where hybrids were "groomed" for this area-- therefore dominated the area.  No longer breeding hybrids here.  B54 series is being dropped and it is the last of our reliables--- locally shines because of its resistance to leaf diseases and heat.  The replacements have no history and the fringe companies can't tell you what the new varieties will do in testing, "they will have to check with whomever we bought it from".  our own testing is a waiste of time because the varieties now have a 3-4 year life.

 

SOOOOO ,   yes all you end up with is race horse hybrids(because selection is done by yield trial) ------In a high stress year you get 220+ in a few spots and insurance claims in a few spots and anything inbetween.

 

We have not been too hot, Just windy and droughthy,,  water pumped ok but It looks to me like a spread of 160-210,  if we don't count the insurance claims on 15% of the crop.  

This seed thing is a real problem for us.

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elcheapo
Veteran Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

Sw. Might find you a heartland genetics
Dealer, and tell him your story. He might
Be able to help.
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bkadds
Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

SW--have you tried any 1151? Been pretty good for us. 33b51 seemed to always need a fungicide as it was GLS susceptible. It yielded well and in ways reminded me of 3162 if you remember that hybrid.
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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

yes we like it a lot.

 

We tried to cheapen up seed and went away from Pioneer for a fair % of our seed.  Helped a little but they still fit our area best.  

The cheapening has to happen now one way or another.

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bkadds
Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

Any recs on what has worked so far? Do you have much rootworm or borer pressure?
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sw363535
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

We have very little rootworm issues we are sandy on most acres and rotate on the good acres.

Boer Pressure ------ yes  we either have to spray or BT  but the problem is we are doing both because of spider mites

The traits save us nothing and the refuge in the bag means we have damage because we have 100% sw corn boer infestation.

 

Recs ----------- no we have some #s we like from another co. in Neb. that are a little cheaper.  Not sure that solves our problem though.

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Hobbyfarmer
Honored Advisor

Re: Tid Bits

White House announces pact to help ag battle climate

The White House announced a partnership Tuesday with Monsanto, Walmart and other companies to better use data to make agriculture and the country's food system more resilient in responding to the growing impact of climate change.

The initiative, part of the Obama administration's push to increase public backing for its climate change agenda, would connect farmers, food distributors and agricultural businesses with data, tools, and information to understand how climate change is impacting their operations while identifying steps they can take to prepare for it.

 

"These steps are a direct response to the president's call for all hands on deck to generate further innovation to help prepare America's communities and business for the impacts of climate change," Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and John Holdren, the president's science adviser, said in a blog posted by the White House.

 

The corporations contributing to the effort announced Tuesday by the White House include Monsanto, Microsoft, PepsiCo, IBM and Amazon. Monsanto said it will donate a maize breeding trial dataset to help public- and private-sector scientists better understand how climate and water-availability changes will impact crop productivity and food security.

 

And PepsiCo pledged to install solar panels at a Gatorade plant in Arizona that would prevent the release of about 50,000 tons of carbon and other greenhouse gases over 25 years.

 

The Obama administration also will host a series of workshops in Washington, D.C., starting Wednesday on data, food resilience, climate change and food emergencies.

 

The climate change announcement comes the same day as the Obama administration warned that failing to fully reduce the carbon pollution that contributes to climate change could cost the U.S. economy $150 billion a year through lost agricultural production, flooding and other disasters like hurricanes.

 

The USDA and the White House have been active in highlighting the impact climate change is having on agriculture where farmers have faced more intense heat waves, severe droughts, floods and other disasters. USDA said in April grants totaling $6 million were given to 10 universities, including Iowa State, to study the effects of climate on agriculture production.

 

Earlier this year, the Obama administration announced the creation of seven regional climate hubs that will help farmers, ranchers and rural communities adapt to extreme weather. One of the stations will be located at the USDA's National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment in Ames.

Already, warmer weather has led to a longer growing season. That has shifted where some crops are grown, while leaving fields more susceptible to pests that are able to survive the winter. In the Midwest and Great Plains, where much of the country's corn, wheat and soybeans are produced, the growing season has been extended by almost two weeks during the last 60 years.

 

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Well the guys with immature crops will love this. Takes the worry out of that just tasseling corn. No frost till Halloween?

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