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Honored Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

Elcheapo, already have one of those,

 

Now if it'd been mangos, I think we could have gotten you into that bridge for just a one time smallish up front fee.

 

 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

Last offer, 1/2 interest in banana business, 1/2 interest in my Alpine ski resort in the flordia keys,
For the bridge....but you must paint bridge purple
With yellow polka dots.
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Veteran Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

18% to 20% seems to be a good moisture level to run corn. Leaving corn out in the field too long can result in wind and wildlife damage. Corn at 17% or less seems to shell at the head more than I would like.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

Blacksandfarmer,

 

Thanks for offering up a decent response and keeping on-topic. What intrigues me is that the Purdue University study was done so long ago, I wonder if the new seed technology is allowing the corn to be left in the field longer without losing yield? As I mentioned, in this low price environment, getting every bushel counts. And what a big yield loss, if the study is true. I know Hobby and el cheapo have swamp land and forest ground to sell me, but I wonder if they have ever conducted any credible research on their farm, much like Purdue has done?

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

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Honored Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

Sorry ME, I farm my swamp here in he bottom.s of South Podunk Country, NOT FOR SALE.

 

Been doing this here on the same what is now the home farm since 1984, guarantee you there have been changes.

 

Is much more money in the  bank now that I wait till the corn is 18% or less than when I was wearing it out augering it 

 

Through the drying system in the 20's. Sure don't miss those gas bills or the added electric costs.

 

Scientific research not so much, end of year financial standing, yep do it every year.

 

I was approached by the practical farmers of Iowa and given a free one year membership earlier this  week, guess someone has been watching? The guy lives fifty miles away, but knows several of my neighbors.

 

I am seldom the highest yielding farmer, but my net ain't chicken feed. 

 

Btw, in this environment, a LOT of humor is needed.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

Called my elevator
20%. Equals 7.5 shrink plus 10 cents drying
(Plus any other dockage)

18%. Equals 5.5% dockage and 7 cents drying

So say you start at 3.10 a bu, you end up 2.88

So a loss of 22 cents (at 18%)

And that's successful farming ????

((FYI...the game is the amount of money, not but)
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Veteran Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

Thanks

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Honored Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

There is another thread in business about "land grant university" relevance.....   This subject is a good example of how disconnected the "educated" can get...... Making recommendations to farmers with no consideration of cost or relevance of the subject......

Several issues are pointed out in this discussion that have to be considered when evaluating those recommendations.  Most research is done on extremely specific premise.. ... drawing broad general conclusions from it is usually inaccurate unless all the criteria match.   

Applying university research to public policy is similar to the current farm program and its "selective" support payments. 

 

Jim's shotgun aproach to new topics occasionally hits on one and I think the relevance of research at land grant universities is a great topic...  The public doesn't seem to desire actually reading it.

If we are going to apply it we have to study the details of that exact study.  Know all the variables, assumptions, and conditions that were involved......

One study done as University research is not easily applicable to a generalization statement.

 

The drying affect of corn, be it weather, mechanical or air movement,,,,,,,, early maturity or late season,,,,, plant moisture or foreign moisture,,,,,,,, shrink from all those variables has certainly been researched in every land grant university from Texas A&M to Minnesota at one time or another,,,,, at the advent of every new idea in grain handling,,, has been done many times...not duplicated, but each one addressing the issue in a specific way.

 

I will only give one, but here is a newsletter from that same university in 2008 that deals with the same issue 

 
That article and most every other research done fails to mention "respiring" as a yield loss level to be concerned with.
Sometimes agronomists just get caught up in "needing to say something"....  
 
How is "respiring" any different that the "sweat" in bin storage?...... (the small amount of humidity that is removed by air circulation in the first few days of grain storage to discourage bacteria growth in warm grain).  It lowers the test weight a small amount but it will not affect yield until moisture content goes below 15.5%
that respiring moisture is not marketable........ it will be removed from yield with the natural shrink of 1.2% weight  per 1% of moisture change by every elevator and buyer.  Fact is they will take 1.3% or more.... so harvesting wet has that additional cost to add to the fuel and handling above the normal shrink-- one of our elevator even pads their drying charges by increasing the shrink % on an accellorating scale.
They are talking about weight you will never get to sell anyway....there is no gain in saving it.
 
I appreciate your adding this comment "Purdue University research indicates that farmers should aim for a harvest moisture content level that considers harvest losses and grain-drying costs." It tried to bring reality back into the discussion.... Field loss and weather loss are real issues and that cost analysis debate is going on on many farms this year..... but saving 2 cents on a postage stamp is not going to pay the national debt. 
 
The responses were silly but not off topic.  The premise of the agronomist took us there....   According to that economist I should be loosing weight when I "respire".... I been doing that research a long time...... I cannot support the theory.  Smiley Happy
 
 
 
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Esteemed Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

My "zzzzz" was not off topic either. With all of the things we have to manage to succeed in this purely competitive business,  this is just not one of them. No one can shell all their corn  (if they can they certainly don't care about a few bu!) in the time required to hit the magical moisture percentage. 

 

Blacksand is right, everyone knows that south of 17 you have field losses, everyone knows that north of 24 you have field losses and damage, and everyone knows to do the best they can, and everyone already does!

 

Point being, it is not a "news" story and it is not of any value....thus.....zzzzzzzzzzzz 

 

:-)

 

Off to shell some more 16.5% corn...I better drive fast to catch up to when it was 23%.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Want More Crops To Sell? Pick Wet Corn

I reviewed things on this thread......am I wrong at looking at the "dockage" cost", and a lower price ?

i'm afraid my post kind of let the air out of eagle eye's balloon, but I don't know if the extra moisture

weight will be more than the approx. 22 cent loss on 18%

yes, there are some merits cutting a bit on the wet side....maybe you fear the wx is going to get worse, so

it might indeed be better to take it now.  could be some degeneration, but that will take a while to

happen.  

I know there are some here that will take it in wet, thinking that the extra weight will make them money,

but i'm not sure about that.  they are not looking at it at damage by wx or the like, they just think the

heavy crops will net you more......

from the dockage charts I've looked at, you could be taking some pretty good hits.

 

hope ole eagle eye isn't mad

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