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jennys_mn
Veteran Advisor

What's Killing Our Bees

Documentary on the Science Channel starting tonight at 8pm CDT. Being repeated at 11 pm.

Jen
6 Replies
KY_TOBDirt
Senior Contributor

Re: What's Killing Our Bees

Got the DVR set, watching The Big Country right now on MGM
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buckfarmer
Senior Contributor

Re: What's Killing Our Bees

Just watched the end. Seemed pretty reasonable. Some wanted to blame agriculture. others defended use of insecticides.
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Blacksandfarmer
Veteran Advisor

Re: What's Killing Our Bees

I've noticed more honey bees this year than probably the last 5 years combined. We also have more clover growing in our lawn than we have had in a while. I've made a point to plant sunflowers in my garden for the bees (and the birds). It doesn't help the bees when every lawn owner decides he or she need nothing other than grass growing in their lawn. Lower corn prices may have pushed more farmers in my area back to planting a hay crop. Broad use of insecticide may have come down over the past couple years as well. It's tough to say, but I sure am glad to be seeing more bees.

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elcheapo
Veteran Advisor

Re: What's Killing Our Bees

I hate to say it that links have been established that the new nicotine
insecticide are lowering the bee
Population. Currently levels being
Looked at and the current thinking
On the toxic levels.
I feel it is over used. All seeds (except alfalfa)
I buy have it. Corn, Milo, soybeans? , sunflowers, they are even putting it on
Wheat
There is 6 to 7 dollar a bushel just for seed treatment
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jennys_mn
Veteran Advisor

Re: What's Killing Our Bees

Yes, unfortunately, there is becoming a fairly good established liked between the neonictinoids and the bee problem.  It's not an issue when the chemical stays intact on the seed.  It's probably why at Syngenta we spent a LOT of time doing dust-off trails on many different types of polymers.  The polymers are used as a water soluable varnish, the makes a hard coat for the chemicals, and when it's planted, will disentigrate and allow the seed to get moisture and release the chemical agents.  The problems occured, in farmers like myself, that used a IH cyclo planter (and others) with these treated seeds, where the seeds rolled around in the drum, rubbing the coating and chemical off, and then was blown by the fan out of the drum and onto the  surface of the ground, where it then was open and available to the bees and was blown about, contaminating everything around the field.  It's a problem, no doubt.

 

Jen

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elcheapo
Veteran Advisor

Re: What's Killing Our Bees

My source was British, working with American. They were finding it was not
Breaking down as fast in the soil as thought.
Also the u.s. core of. Engineers has found
It in their rivers and streams.
FDA is pretesting toxicity and California is
Looking at it

The most telling evidence is the amount
of money being spent trying to tell
Everyone how safe it is.

Why not when it makes a bag of seed
An extra $ 70 -$80.
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