cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Honored Advisor

Re: Where Are The Corn Piles

Jump to solution

SW Ks has em ------------ as we always do in the big water areas.  

 

A few smaller ones at Plains Ks, 

 

Those piles are saved for the ethanol/feeding industry or rail to the west coast.  

 

0 Kudos
Senior Contributor

Re: Where Are The Corn Piles

Jump to solution

Several of the big coops in North central Iowa built more million bu steel storage facilities this summer because of all the '11 AND '12 corn stored in their existing facilities that wasn't for sale.

 

Wow Hobby. Hard to imagine the thought process of guys paying for long term commercial storage for corn with buyers paying over $ 7.00 per bushel. Moved some Harvestore silos back in the mid 80's for a guy from Monmouth, IL who had 3 years of corn in on farm storage. But prices had been hovering near 2 bucks for a long time and when they got up near 4 bucks that summer, he emptied the bins.

0 Kudos
Contributor

Re: Where Are The Corn Piles

Jump to solution

Corn is a tall plant grass that has large ears with many seeds or kernels. These seeds grow in rows on the larger ears and are eaten as a vegetable. Corn is grown as food for both people and animals.

Corn, also called maize, is a cereal grass related to wheat, rice, oats, and barley. It is a plant whose food value and wide variety of uses make it the most important crop grown in the United States and one of the most important in the world. In order of world grain production, corn ranks second after wheat and is followed by third-ranking rice.  Organic Product Distributors

http://www.earthendelight.com/earthendelight-organic-product-corn.html

0 Kudos
Honored Advisor

Re: Where Are The Corn Piles

Jump to solution

Ray...you are overstating the "record yields in the east" story. Not many areas with record yields, sure a few, but not many. Just lots a average yields and varies pretty dramatically from township to township. Big C in Tipton has no ground bags out. They have had in 11 and 12 hardly high yield years. Besides harvest is over so the big yield has been hidden. Will you have to pay to get it out of hiding? Not next summer, buy maybe this winter? Those that say to lock the bins till next summer are not very good students of history.

 

Both of IN yield numbers are pretty optomistic. 174 with the late planting in areas, spring flooding, and late season dryness? Not confirmed by any of the normal indicators like ground piles and basis, or even regional test plot data that is always fantastic but this year is not much better than normal for those plots. Besides it inside the margin of error of the old record of 171, so end-users can repeat "record yields" all they want...the basis just keeps getting tighter. Regional demand is far greater than the old record year, regional stocks to use is not even close to the record for the last decade.

 

The bean number is just wishful thinking, it will be revised down sometime, who knows when? They must have forgotten that DC beans don't make 50 :-) 

 

Of course, this is the only data that counts until they change it a year from now. It means that basis will have to be strong to get movement, so we'll move it :-)  Take what they give you, when they give it...has always been pretty good marketing thought process.

 

0 Kudos