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Honored Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

Yes really -------------- I know the meaning of the term.  I just don't know what "you" intend by the use of it.  It is what the "all knowing" crowd does, use popular, newly defined terms to place blame while never actually being part of a solution.

 

I thought you might be discussing the demographics of the population in the high plains.  

One never knows what the political spitting are all about, but this is the kind of response you get.

 

"You need to have an explanation - really --- "      

 

Keep your worthless explanation.

 

 

Highlighted
Honored Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

Sorry we missed you weedman.

 

Your welcome anytime.

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Highlighted
Veteran Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

Pretty hard to comprehend the scope of what you folks are living thru.

Pictures can't really capture the scale/magnitude of the area involved.

Radar shows a little blue area of moisture in SW Kansas but with a humidity of 47% it's hard to see any of it reaching the ground.

Is it going to take a hurricane hitting Texas and hooking north to get you some moisture?

 

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

Looking on google earth in non political and as it is being proven by dust storm after dust storm event that the size of the fields has grown and the landscape has changed due to the enlargment of the machinery - pretty simple although it wasn't that many month's back that some folks where mocking at the Dust Bowl documentary ---we have had interesting events with wind erosion in Nebraska due to folks removing shelter belts here to gain another 16 rows planted only to loose decades of regained organic matter ---up here ancestors are churning in their graves knowing the toil they spent installing sheltr belts only to have that wisdom tossed aside with short sided thinking it can never happen here --- reviewing history I have been told is old fashion - although typing on a smart device doesn't seem to still the drifting sand ---  

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

K-289 some of the worst blowing has been in pasture ground. I don't think the size of tractor has anything to do with that
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Highlighted
Senior Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

That is not a good sign and thankfully we have had an 1 inch plus here --- have guys traveling highway 54  & 56 in Ks. - Ok. - Tx.  & NM  and some of the cell photos are quite unsettling ---  

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Veteran Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

sw,

 

my heart goes out to you -- further, you are realtime accounting what the old woman from your local area paper was saying - Ms.Webb, was it?-------------------------she lived IN the dust bowl as a teenager and SAID --in the article that, "THIS IS WORSE."

 

AND, I do not remember you posting anything of this severity/magnitude over the last 2 years!

 

seems like about 3-4 weeks now this more severe phenom has been occuring per your posts...c-x-1

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Senior Advisor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

There is actually a fungal lung disease called 'valley fever' contracted from blowing dust. The fungus lives in the soil. The drier the soil the more it blows around. Az had to move a prison this year because of it. Often fatal and can scar the lungs and cause permanent damage.

 

Meanwhile, tonight I thought I saw a snake on the cold road coming in. The PNW's only boa constrictor called the rubber boa. No other snakes would be out in such cold weather with the ground below 50*. They're not big. The biggest I've found is 26", til this one. I just wrapped him around my wrist and he flexed like he was going to take my blood pressure. So cold my wrist got cold. Left the thing on my wrist while I washed up and had dinner. He might be 50 y.o. They look and feel like smooth rubber and are quite slow moving. Rarely seen. Few people around here know we even have such a thing.

 

Rubber Boa.jpg

Highlighted
Senior Contributor

Re: Winter wheat and static elec.

Wow, Palouser! That's pretty wild! How long did the little fella stay cinched up on you like that? 

 

I remember changing water on our old flood irrigation fields and seeing rattlesnakes lying up between the burm and pipe on the low side of the pipe to cool off during the heat of the summer. They'd almost be entranced, so were never dangerous even when you reached down close to 'em, but that sure put a little extra pep in your step!

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