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Frequent Contributor

Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Any ideas if I would face a 5-10% yield drag growing soybeans straight for 10 years on a piece of ground? Thanks.

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9 Replies
Contributor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Ive grown beans for 4 years now continuosly on a farm. I always plant it into rye immediately after combining. So far my yield has gone up each year. Im about 10 bushels higher than the first year. Beginning year was after alfalfa.

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Pull a cyst test before you even consider it.

 

If baseline cyst is vrey low, maybe, and I'd probably alternate between resistant and non-resistant varieties?

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Advisor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Yield losses can approach 21% in fields. Your better off choosin high productivity fields that do not pond. Otherwise you will be dissapointed.

-10% for any crop following itself 2nd year.
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Veteran Contributor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Make sure you start off with low nematode populations if you're going to even think about it.  Also, make sure you don't leave a green bridge for insects and diseases. 

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Senior Contributor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

The local airport leases some ground surrounding their property. They limit crops to "low growing crops". The guys who rent it have raise beans on that ground for over ten years. All I can say is their beans look good from the road.
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Senior Contributor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

I found your comments interesting.  How tall do you let the rye get before you plant and how do you kill it?  

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Advisor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

I'd advise against using a rye cover crop in your continuous soybean rotation, unless erosion is a big problem for your soils.

 

The research into the use of rye as a break for disease in soybeans has shown that there is almost no measurable benefit to the practice and mostly just extra costs, hence why no one does it.

 

Attached is the research of which I am speaking of. Clearly, you will see that it is not worth your time to plant cover rye, unless you have erosion or soil quality issues. If you are late terminating this crop and decide to grow corn, you will have massive yield losses compared to just seeding into a field of soybean stubble.

 

Here it is: http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/docs/v6soy1.pdf

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Senior Contributor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Interesting read, I missed where this research was done, Ontario Canada?  We may have a little jump on the season here in Iowa.  How about other cover crops for the continuous soybean rotation? Oats, redclover, Winter peas?  I have selectively planted Winter Rye in harvested corn and bean fields for years for erosion control, sometimes just a drill width across a hill or water ways.  I then plant and spray right through the strips.  Corn planted into rye has to be time right to avoid a big yield loss.  Beans seem to be a lot more forgiving.

 

 

 

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Advisor

Re: Yield drag on soybeans only rotation

Peas: nothing. Red clover: n+general consistent yield increase. Oats? Would have to look again
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