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Senior Advisor

Re: I post my sales

Come on Palouser you mean there are still wheat farmers that don't have self steering tractors?  LOL

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Senior Advisor

Re: I post my sales

There are a lot of guidance screens in tractors out here but the steering part isn't that good in this steep country. And there are few straight lines here. I'm steering on a curve about 95% of the time. And RTK won't help when you have 3'-5' drift with an implement on a hillside and your crab steering to keep the tractor on the contour. By the way, what's an A-B line? 

 

If you rely on auto steer in an articulated tractor here you wind up with a lot of skips. Go from one side of the field to the other? Usually impossible in the sense a row crop farmer would be thinking of. Look up 'The Palouse' as 'images' and add 'harvest'. You'll get my drift (I mean 'skip')  Smiley Wink

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Advisor

Re: I post my sales

Palouser, I watched a you tube video of combining wheat in your region. It would take a strong flatlander to do what they do. It looks like the area was too steep for a cow to walk on, so they thought planting wheat was a good option. Mike M, myself, don kraft, BA, and even niafarmer would be peeing our pants if we had to work there!

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Veteran Advisor

Re: I post my sales

Last summer, Palouser gave Mrs J and I a day long excursion through his farming country....it was an amazing place, and we're ready to go back to that beautiful area...

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Frequent Contributor

Palouser ?

Looking at those pics makes me wonder, how large are your fields?,

Are they made up in square sections like in Midwest?

Also how do you truck the grain out of th fields with out turning a grain cart or truck over?

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Senior Advisor

Some answers

Rule #1 Trucks always go straight up or down a slope. Otherwise you start sliding sideways and over you go when full. 

 

Rule #2  In a combine think before doing something stupid like turn up hill on a steep slope with much of a load. If a coupler breaks, you lose traction or are in the wrong gear you are in trouble instantly. PS - Our modified machines usually have outboard brakes. Be careful heading downhill if there is any possibility your transmission can pop out of gear. Check before going over the ridge.

 

Rule #3 (or one)  NEVER hurry. take your time.

 

Our fields are surveyed and laid out like any fields anywhere, except you can't farm them that way.  120 acres might break up into 7 or 8 pieces - or more - for harvest. Sometimes you can't cross drainages and you have to stay on somewhat of a contour. On the other hand fencelines go straight so there are very steep places whenre you need to attack them from above and go down the steepest slopes until there is enough of a land to turn going back and forth on the contour, A turn in those situations is often either a slow turn down hill to double back to keep the rear from sliding, or if attacking from below, turn up hill with some momentum and then drift back slowly and watch in the mirror that you aren't pushing your steering wheels sideways as yopu complete a 3-point turn.

 

Even i can get butterflies coming over a ridge on a fenceline to a steep north sidehill I have to go down. The I remember that I've done this many times. in the day I've slid and spun off sidehills, one time tilted the wrong way near a ravine, with a full tank, leveled the wrong way (down hill) with wheat graviting out the fixed unloading auger. And the hydraulics weren't powerful enough to lift the machine up back to level (answer - go get a tarp and auger out more grain until it can pick itself up, then shovel). Fewer people get hurt or killed here as the mchines are much wider for their height than they used to be. But the current machines don't level as far as they used to. Only 32* today and it used to be over 40*, so one does limit out often for at least short runs. But, I don't have what they call 'steep ground' Smiley Wink

 

Welcome back anytime Ray!

 

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Advisor

Re: Some answers

Geez, and I thought that one 7 acre hillside field I combine where I have to leave the header down headed downhill or the back wheels won't steer was fun....LOL. It's really fun when you plug something and have to try and back up..the back wheels might be turning..but there's usually a lot of air under them..LOL.

 

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Senior Advisor

Re: Some answers

I run red machines and our drive wheels are moved forward with the leveling modifications. Our rear tires either have fluid in them and/or a lot of weight is added to the back in the form of solid cast axle beams, tractor weights or steel bars. Sometimes this isn't enough to keep enough weight on the back to steer easily. Steering brakes and a watchful eye on the mirrors help.

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