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Contributor

Re: drought devastation

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Blacksand,   Crop insurance will not penalize you at all for chopping silage.  You leave check strips and have them field measure for yield. Whatever they come up with will be what your loss will be figured on.  We chop silage every year and crop insurance measures the yield for our APH and also for loss adjustments.  We in NW Iowa had nice rains in May, but 2nd driest June on record and none yet in July.   Corn is turning gray and just starting to tassel.  This 'garden spot' won't be a garden for long. Fading fast.

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Veteran Advisor

Re: drought devastation

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MT you bring up a couple good points here. I think the industry as a whole may learn some lessons out of 2012..... The biggest lesson learned above the farm level may come in the form of USDA projecting averages rather than top end yield. I NEVER thought 166 would happen this year!!!!! That's why I contracted so little corn. (good thing) On the farm level or in my personal case my risk management will end up being where I lose the most money this year. I knew we could have tough year sometime and that's why I have crop insurance.... I didn't foresee a complete wipe-out of our crop though and my soybean obligations are starting to worry me. We have had some poor corn growing years as of late, but beans have been able to hold on and yield well... Maybe not this year.

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Contributor

Re: drought devastation

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Seems the u.s.d.a. has to eat more crow than the politians running for office. What a sad choice we have to pick from this comming election. Enough politics.. I can easily remember 1977- 1988 and the genetics were no where near where they are today. We had ear corn that fell through the wire on Belen ear corn cribs. 88 was a little better with a lot of below 100 b. acre. Spider mites were terible in the beans, you could walk through them and your clothes would be oily from the descreation from them, but we did have 25- 35 bu. yeilds. No matter what the genectics are they can"t  perform without water, and that is the case today. I live about 70 mile   s. east of Des Moines Ia.  We are much better off than some not too far away but the last good rain was Memorial weekend, 9  th. inch, since ,several 1/10 to .. 25 in the most . more shirt damperners. The crops detereated a lot the week of the 4th. triple digts all week. Still we are hopeing for some yeild. The pastures are all but gone and when you rotate they don 't recover any..  we might hav e to learn how to live with much lower yeilds in the comming years than we have in the past good one's. I wonder if the price of machinery and repairs will will follow suit????  What a laugh . Pray for better days ahead and thank the lord we live in the  best place in the world.

 

grampa

 

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Veteran Advisor

Re: drought devastation

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Here is a picture of a cornfield a ways West of me, about a week after they got a nice rain, and 'greened' things up again:

 

 

IMG_0065 - Copy.JPG

 

 

Here is an alfalfa field nearby, that also got in on the rain, hence the 'green' hue to the field.  Before the rain, the ground in between the 'sprigs' looked like a wheat field someone baled.  The 'sprigs' are all that grew after first cutting, and they are starting to bloom.  The nice looking corn in the background, is irrigated.

 

 

IMG_0070.JPG

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