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Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Arthritis?

Anyone else noticing aches and pains aren't as bad, with warmer weather? Mike and I were stretched out last night watching TV, and it suddenly occurred to me that nothing hurt. It's been a long time since I could make that claim.

Are warmer days making you feel like a spring chicken, too?
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15 Replies
turkey feather
Senior Contributor

Re: Arthritis?

Warmer Days?  Not yet here but coming.  Grass will soon need cutting. It seems so green this year. Must have been all that snow.

Seriously for the first time I can tell that cold damp weather makes my legs hurt. Maybe the warmer days will help that. I am not fond of hot weather.

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Re: Arthritis?

Nope,  warmer spring weather means  more physical labor.    I had to get up and take something last night so my legs would quit aching and I could sleep.      Cleaning out MIL's garage.   The woman must have had issues with ants once upon a time.    Lots of leftover ant killer.   Reader's Digest Condensed Books.... I bet we are up close to  75 of them by now.   Need to get another rubbermaid for farm books too.     Someday we have to tackle the basement  too. 

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Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Arthritis?

Like you, Suey, I was taking aspirin after heavy yardwork...but it doesn't seem necessary since we got into the seventies and pushing eighty. I am excited for you guys getting the big house, but clearing it out has to be a bear.

Turkey, spring is coming. Winn kicked off his Crocs outside this morning. Ground is a bit damp for me to do that, but kids seem okay, as long as the sun is warm.

We got PaPa to help us assemble a compost tumbler I had caught on Sam's clearance a couple of falls ago. Seems like a whole different lifetime. Now, our weeds we pull and garden waste will have a place to become useful. Seeds arrived yesterday, and I have plans to pick up herb plants next trip to town.

My knees are still just trouble free this morning, even after a good long outdoor work/playtime. Maybe buckling down on gluten again this week is helping, too. Whatever, it feels great!

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Ruby Lou
Senior Contributor

Re: Arthritis?

I had been eating a small bit of ice cream before I went to bed....like I need it...anyway, I always seemed to wake up achy, legs tight, etc.   I have not eaten any lately and have not woke up achy.  I am lactose intolerant to a point.  Of course it may be that our bedroom heater has not been working so I am not as warm as usual either.  speaking of finding books, I found phonebooks at my moms from timbucktoo and years old!  Right now the dumpster is broke...dang, i sure hope she doesn't see those before I get rid of them!  maybe that is why she wants to come home....wants to see what I have been throwing away!  I am sure there are a zillion readers digest in the attic along with the National Geographics in the basement that she won't let us throw away...really, who wants them.  (My grandfather collected them!)

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dairy mom
Senior Contributor

Re: Arthritis?

Not warm enough here to tell really.  But I never seem to be pain free.  I have carpel tunnel which is a nuisance.  But the real problem is the tennis elbow in my left elbow.  Can be really painful.  Have had the swelling from it for years but it never was really painful until this last year.  I have a slide on ace bandage with a wrap for a couple of pressure points that usually takes care of the pain fairly quickly.

I still have to make the appointment to get my teeth fixed.  Don't really know why I am putting that off.  Maybe when that is done I'll look into finding someone to give me some help with the stupid elbows. 

Course it didn't help that the other evening a bull calf head butted me right square on my better elbow while I was feeding another bull calf.

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Husker-J
Senior Contributor

Re: Arthritis?

Part of it may be your better eating habits.

I read how you are reducing gluten, and eating more 'green', which have lots of secondary health benefits.

Disclaimer:   My wife works with health supplements/dietary aids, and from going with her to some 'health' meetings, I have learned that many more people than originally thought are gluten intolerant.   It is just that for the vast majority of people, it is only a 'minor' intolerance, that does not really affect function, except that too much gluten may make one feel 'slow' or 'achy'.   The simplest way to find that out, is to go totally gluten free for a week or 10 days, and see what happens.   For some people, it makes a world of difference, for others, none at all.   However, from my blind guessing from the limited number of people I have seen, maybe half the people who have tried it, have found some form of improvement.   Also, most of them, didn't have to stay totally gluten free, just cut back a bit, to their tolerance level.

 

Secondly, the more 'green' you eat, the more alkali your system becomes.   Acid in your system is a natural occurance, but it tends to settle in areas that have strain, injury, or arthritis.   Excessive acid creates a reaction that causes stiffness and achiness.   The BEST thing for that, is eating right (more green veggies) and excercising (doesn't have to be all that much, just get the circulation going, so acid doesn't 'settle').   On this, I would say 3/4 of the people in my totally un-scientific guess are helped enough to notice by things that reduce acid buildup.    Most people are aided by acid reduction in some way.   More often than not, diet is enough, but some people may need supplementing.

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turkey feather
Senior Contributor

Re: Arthritis?

i would like to hear more. The acid bulding up settleing in specific areas sounds like my problem. Which green vegetables? A certain supplement that your wife sells or somethig else?

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Husker-J
Senior Contributor

Re: Arthritis?

First off, I'm not here to try to sell anything, but rather to help if I can, so I won't talk any supplements here (not to mention, I don't belive they allow soliciting here).

Secondly, the dirty little secret that most supplement sellers don't tell you, is that for 90% of the people, supplements are not necessary, if they have the willpower to truly eat the right foods for their metabolism.   Where suppliments come in, is for the people who like to 'cheat' on what they eat, or the 10% or less, that truly have a metabolic imbalance.   With a little luck, and willpower, I might be able to help you just by steering you towards the right foods.   Remember, though, I am by no means an 'expert', and this advice is worth what you paid for it.

 

OK, as far as diet, it is important to stick with it for a week to 10 days to really see if it helps.   'Cheating' can bring the gluten or acid levels up pretty quick.   For each day, try to eat half or more (by volume) of green veggies.   Avoid starchy foods (you don't have to eliminate them, but limit them).   For example, instead of chicken and rice, have chicken and broccoli.   Pretty much anything that is green, and grows above ground is good, and the darker green the better.   A couple exceptions to this would be apples, bananas, and tomatoes, those are good, as well.   Lean protein is fine, even red meat is fine in moderation, as are eggs.   Protein or dairy (cheese) is great for snacks if you are not lactose intolerant (the snacks are often what gets you, convenience junk foods are bad).   Also, try to reduce gluten as much as practical, as a gluten intolerance, can also cause joint stiffness and a general achiness.  Try to eliminate processed grains, go whole grain if you can (like whole wheat bread instead of white).  Don't forget plenty of water, as well.

Lettuce/spinach salads are great, but watch the dressing.   Blue Cheese and Ranch are the best for you. 

Try to stick to a diet with a lot of greens, and no to low gluten for a week to 10 days, and see how you feel.  Honestly, that should have a similar effect as an alkalizing supplement, as far as reducing acid.   If you can stick to the diet, and feel no improvement, chances are acid settling in your joints is not your problem.   Only if you feel 'somewhat' better, but feel you could get more improvement with more acid reduction, should you start thinking supplements (or if the diet helps, but you know you will eventually cheat on it, and you want something to neutralize the acid in the foods you eat).

One of the biggest signs reducing acid was helpful, is if you overexert yourself (for example you work in the garden and use some muscles you haven't used in a while), and you find yourself realizing that while your muscles are a bit 'stiff' they really aren't 'sore', meaning that you can tell you overdid it a bit, but it doesn't really 'hurt', or at least don't hurt as much as you expected them to.

Lastly, if the diet change helps, it usually comes on gradually.   Try and make at least a mental note of how you feel every morning, so you can note any improvement.   Truth be told, I changed my diet, and didn't think it did any good, because the improvements came slowly, a little at a time, over maybe 10 days.   It wasn't until I 'fell off the wagon', skipped a lot of the good foods, and ate what I shouldn't have for a couple days, and woke up feeling 'slow', did I realize that that used to be my 'normal' and being able to jump out of bed and 'go' was a result of my diet changes.

See what happens, I will try to read through my notes if I can come up with anything else, and maybe we can get you feeling a bit better.  Only if you get some improvement, and think you need 'more' will we begin to talk about what to look for in a supplement.

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Kay/NC
Honored Advisor

Re: Arthritis?

In general, people tolerate the most nutritious dark green, leafy vegetables well. They are part of every diet for weight control I have ever seen.

Much as I love roots, they tend to be very high in carbs, as does fruit. There are times when I need to set both aside, with all the grains and other white foods, and just feed on predominantly protein.

I mentioned eating gluten free some months ago...and it was very revealing. It didn't take long for my joints to feel better. I let my resolve slip, a pizza slice here, a yeast roll there, and the pain returned.

Started eating Atkins last Tuesday, and with no grains in the extremely low-carb induction phase, I have no pain in any joint this morning, which is very unusual. This is with no meds at all, and after a hard afternoon's landscaping chores. That is a pretty fast response.

I honestly believe that most of our health problems are diet-related. The pH thing is crucial, because we know living things exist within their own fairly narrow range. It makes sense to me that if a few degrees of fever kill off a pathogen, so could the right acid/alkali balance in the body.

As you note, most things can be resolved by eating right for your body. That can mean different things for different people, I think. Supplementation of diet is a wide open wilderness. Hard to know where your best expenditures may be....
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